National Catalogue of NWS Products

Report - listing of OFFICIAL Products in database, sorted by product name.
 
Product Name Brief Description
 
3 Day Space Weather ForecastA 3-Day Space Weather Forecast product to relay forecast information about anticipated space weather activity, in formats consistent with existing NOAA Scale thresholds and tailored to a government decision maker perspective.
 
3- to 14-day Hazards AssessmentThe Climate Prediction Center issues this product for the contiguous U.S. and Alaska to provide potential hazardous conditions from extreme temperature, high wind, heavy precipitation or lack of precipitation, and dry or moist soils and wildfire risk.
 
3- to 14-day Hazards Assessment DiscussionThe Climate Prediction Center (CPC) provides a text discussion for the contiguous U.S. and Alaska with technical insight to further assist in assessing potentially hazardous conditions in the 3-to 14-Day Hazards Assesment.
 
5-Day Graphical Tropical Weather Outlook The 2 day and 5 day Graphical Tropical Weather Outlooks have been combined into one product- graphical tropical weather outlook SEE catalog entry for the Graphical Tropical Weather Outlook.
 
6- to 10-Day and 8- to 14-day Excessive Heat Outlooks (Contiguous U.S)The Climate Prediction Center (CPC) issues 6- to 10-Day and 8- to 14-Day excessive heat outlooks in probabilistic format for the Contiguous U.S.
 
6- to 10-Day and 8- to 14-day Maximum Heat Index PredictionThe Climate Prediction Center (CPC) issues 6- to 10-Day and 8- to 14-Day Maximum Heat Index Predictions for approximately 200 locations in the Contiguous U.S.
 
6- to 10-Day and 8- to 14-Day Mean North American 500 millibar OutlookThe Climate Prediction Center (CPC) issues these outlooks to provide insight into the 6- to 10-day and 8- to 14-day temperature and precipitation outlooks by indicating mean circulation patterns.
 
6- to 10-Day and 8- to 14-day Minimum Wind Chill Prediction (Contiguous U.S and Alaska)CPC will issue maps indicating the probability (in percent) that the minimum wind chill value will in the below normal category and below seven specific thresholds: 32F, 28F, 20F, 10F, 0F, -20F, and -40F. The wind chill index formula is described in Instruction 10-513 (WFO Winter Weather Products Specification)
 
6- to 10-Day and 8- to 14-Day Outlook Discussion (Contiguous U.S. and Alaska).The Climate Prediction Center (CPC) provides a technical discussion of the meteorological and climatological basis for the outlooks.
 
6- to 10-Day and 8- to 14-Day Outlooks (Contiguous U.S. and Alaska)The Climate Prediction Center (CPC) issues 6- to 10-Day and 8- to 14-Day outlooks in probabilistic format for the Contiguous U.S. and Alaska.
 
7- Day Evapotranspiration ForecastThe 7-day evapotranspiration forecast displays graphically on the Internet the expected amount of evapotranspiration in hundredths of an inch for each of the next 7 days using a reference crop of alfalfa. A second graphic is provided for each day that indicates whether the evapotranspiration is expected to be above or below normal. This product will be issued daily at 5 am local time on a seasonal basis (March 15-October 15).
 
ABRFC Recreational Forecast GraphicsThe National Weather Service (NWS) is the agency responsible for issuing river forecasts and flood warnings for the United States. This information is provided in order to protect life and property as well as to enhance the national economy. In cooperation with national, state and local agencies, as well as private organizations and the public, the NWS determines the river levels which correspond to the beginning of significant damage from high water. This level of water at a given river location is termed flood stage. The NWS issues special river forecasts and flood warnings when levels are expected to equal or exceed flood stage. In addition to problems caused by flooding, various users have danger and incur risk due to river fluctuations and river levels lower than flood stage. Examples of these types of users of river forecast information include navigation interests or the general public who use the river and river banks for recreational purposes. The experimental Recreational Forecast graphics are Internet web pages that depict the expected river levels for the Illinois River of Oklahoma, a very popular canoe and raft float stream. These expected stream flow levels are translated to a river floatability index based on guidelines provided by the Illinois River Association and the State of Oklahoma Scenic Rivers Commission. Recreational interests can use the information to better insure a safe experience on and near the river.
 
ADVANCED HYDROLOGIC PREDICTION SERVICE (AHPS) FLOOD INUNDATION MAP INTERFACEThe NWS River Forecast Centers produce river stage forecasts for more than three thousand locations in the U.S. These forecasts reference numeric gage heights at a single site along the river, generally in or near a city. Flood inundation maps are available for specific NWS forecast points where a flood inundation library has been developed through a partnership with Federal, state, and/or local agencies. Flood Inundation Maps show the extent of flooding expected spatially over a given area. This will indicate where roadways, streets, buildings, airports, etc., are likely to be impacted by floodwaters. Combined with river observations and NWS river forecasts, inundation maps provide decision-makers additional information needed to better mitigate the impacts of flooding and build more resilient communities.
 
Air Quality Index (AQI)The Air Quality Index (AQI)), also know as Clearing Index and Ventilation Index is both a text and graphical product produced by forecasters in support of the Fire Weather Program. The AQI has been used for many years by health and land management officials to help determine pollution and smoke dispersion on any given day. AQI numbers range from 0 (no dispersion) to 1000+ (excellent dispersion). When used as a Ventilation Index, values range from 0 to 100,000
 
Airman's Meteorological Advisories (AIRMET)AIRMETs are concise descriptions in abbreviated language of the development and occurrence or expected occurrence in time and space of specified en-route weather phenomena issued by the National Weather Services Aviation Weather Center, Alaskan Aviation Weather Unit, and Weather Forecast Office Honolulu. AIRMET phenomena can affect the safety of aircraft operations. Bulletins contain details of potentially hazardous conditions over the continental United States, Alaska, Hawaii, and adjacent waters. An AIRMET will be issued when any of the following weather phenomena occur and affect an area of at least 3,000 square miles: Moderate icing, Moderate turbulence, Sustained surface wind of 30 knots or more, Ceilings less than 1,000 feet and/or visibility less than miles affecting over 50 percent of an area at any one time or, Extensive mountain obscuration (may be less than 3000 square miles for Pacific Ocean islands).
 
Alaska Graphic Area ForecastThe Alaska Graphic Area Forecast (GFA) is a graphical representation of forecasts contained in the text Area Forecasts (FA) for Alaska. The GFA is comprised of four separate graphics produced using NMAP software at the Alaska Aviation Weather Unit (AAWU).
 
Alaska Low Level Significant Weather Graphic (SWL)The Alaska Low Level Significant Weather Graphic (SWL) is a graphic product providing an outlook forecast of significant weather for aviation below 25,000 ft (FL250).
 
Alaska Region NDFD Grids 6kmPDD updated in 2014 to extend comment period. PDD updated in 2013 to extend comment period. PDD updated in 2012 to extend comment period. PDD updated in 2011 to extend comment period. PDD updated in 2010 to extend comment period and to update links. PDD updated in 2009 to include new elements: Hazards, Weather, Temperature, Dew Point, Wind Gust, Sky Cover, Apparent Temperature, Relative Humidity, Quantitative Precipitation Forecast (QPF) and Snow Amount. Under statute, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) National Weather Service (NWS) is charged to collect data on climate, water, and weather, provide forecasts and warnings of severe weather in order to protect life and property, and create and disseminate forecasts and other weather information for the benefit of a wide range of weather sensitive businesses and activities. By capitalizing on rapid advances in science and technology and infusing these advances into its operations, the NWS has taken steps to proactively respond to ever changing and growing demands of its users. The most recent experimental digital datasets (and associated graphic forecast displays) integrated into NDFD are the following elements for Alaska: Maximum Temperature, Minimum Temperature, 12-hour Probability of Precipitation, Wind Speed, Wind Direction, and Significant Wave Height.
 
Alaskan Sea Surface Temperature AnalysisSea surface temperature analysis for the waters surrounding Alaska.
 
Approach and Departure Gate Forecasts for Convection (TRACON)TRACON Approach and Departure Gate Forecasts will complement the Collaborative Convection Forecast product by providing greater detail of convective occurrence. TRACON Approach and Departure Gate Forecasts will be developed for the 8 TRACONs New York, Atlanta,Houston, Dallas Fort Worth, Miami, Denver and Chicago. TRACON Approach and Departure Gate Forecasts will provide ATCSCC, ARTCC, TMU and TRACON a graphical product for planning air traffic flow safely and efficiently around convection into and out of the TRACON area. The graphic will provide easy to interpret color-coded convective forecasts and allow partners to make more informed decisions regarding the air traffic flow through the NAS.
 
Area Fire Weather Forecast Matrix (AFW) for WFO GSPLand management agencies in Georgia, North Carolina and South Carolina have expressed a need for easily accessible tabular forecast data similar to the Point Fire Weather Forecast Matrix (PFW), except that it encompass an entire fire weather zone instead of just a point. The requirement is for something similar to the existing Area Forecast Matrix (AFM), but with fire weather/smoke management parameters included. It would be tailored to facilitate fire behavior applications in the planning stage by land managers. An area fire weather matrix would satisfy this need well because it would allow agency specialists to quickly run sample fire behavior models for planning purposes for random areas outside of PFW forecast points. The experimental product will be called the Area Fire Weather Forecast Matrix (AFW) and would be generated routinely for all 56 zones in the WFO Greenville-Spartanburg (GSP) county warning area. (CWA) : The experimental AFW is produced by running a modified AFM formatter that uses the local digital forecast data base (DFD). The product will be generated via a GFE automation script every time grids are published by a forecaster. A script will also post the AFW to the WFO GSP website. No additional grids or forecaster intervention will be required.
 
Atlantic and Pacific High Wind and Associated SeasDepicts areas of strong winds and associated seas over large parts of the Atlantic and Pacific. Issued outside the hurricane season.
 
Atlantic Hurricane OutlookThe Climate Prediction Center (CPC) issues the Hurricane Outlook for the Atlantic basin. No outlook, however, can give certainty as to whether or not a particular locality will be impacted by a tropical storm or hurricane in any given year.
 
Audio Weather BriefingThe Audio Weather Briefing is an Internet-accessible recording that provides a wide suite of weather information. The recording contains information that alerts users to any hazardous weather that is forecast to affect the region for a period of seven days from the recording date, with a heavy emphasis on the current days weather. The recording explains, in broad and primarily non-technical terms, what weather features are expected to affect the region, as well as what specific weather hazards may result from these features (flooding, tornadoes, excessive heat, severe thunderstorms, tropical weather, fog, rip currents, etc.)
 
Aviation Area Forecast (FA)Aviation Area Forecasts (FAs) describe in abbreviated language the development and occurrence or expected occurrence in time and space of specified en-route weather phenomena below Flight Level (FL) 45,000 ft (450). The FA is a forecast of visual meteorological conditions(VMC), clouds, and general weather conditions over an area the size of several states. In Alaska, the FA also includes forecasts of Instrument Flight Rule (IFR) conditions as well as other AIRMET and SIGMET information on thunderstorms, wind, icing and turbulence. Over CONUS and Hawaii, the FA must be used in conjunction with the in-flight aviation weather advisories to understand the complete weather picture. Together, they are used to determine forecast en-route weather and to interpolate conditions at airports for which no Terminal Area Forecasts (TAFs) are issued.
 
Aviation Digital Data ServiceThe Aviation Digital Data Service (ADDS) makes available to the aviation community through the internet digital and graphical analyses, forecasts and observations of meteorological variables. Developed as the data distribution component of the Aviation Gridded Forecast System (AGFS), ADDS is a joint effort of NOAA Forecast Systems Laboratory (FSL), NCAR Research Applications Program (RAP), and the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP)Aviation Weather Center (AWC). ADDS makes access to National Weather Service aviation observations and forecasts easy by integrating this information in one location, and by providing visualization tools to assist the application of thisinformation for flight planning.
 
Aviation Digital Data Service Flight Path ToolThe FPT allows a user to view data along a specified route of flight. The user can view important weather information on a map. Points can be entered along a route, so that the data can be viewed in a vertical cross section. Weather information that can be displayed on the FPT horizontal and vertical cross section views includes, but is not limited to: Wind Temperature Relative humidity Icing potential Turbulence potential AIRMETs and SIGMETs PIREPs TAFs METARs
 
Aviation Tropical Cyclone Advisory (TCA)The TCA is an alphanumeric text product produced by hurricane forecasters consisting of information extracted from the official National Hurricane Center forecasts. The TCA is intended to provide short-term tropical cyclone forecast guidance for international aviation purposes.
 
Aviation Weather Center Impacts Terminal Aerodrome Forecast (TAF) BoardThe AWC Impacts TAF board is a time series display of weather conditions at select airports across the United States. Each box (hourly forecasts from TAF) is color-coded based on the level of the hazard. White represents no impact, yellow slight impact, orange medium impact, and red high impact. The letters in the box represent the cause of the hazard. They are as follows: -CIG – Ceiling (hundreds of feet, Above Ground Level [AGL]) -VIS – Visibility (statute miles) -WX – Weather (see legend) -WSpd – Wind speed (knots) -WGust – Wind gusts (knots)
 
Aviation Weather Warning (AWW)The AWW is a National Weather Service (NWS) operational warning for weather with the potential to impact ground operations at some airports. Specific warning criteria are decided by local airport management and the supporting Weather Forecast Office and
 
Aviation Winter Weather DashboardThe Aviation Winter Weather Dashboard depicts the potential winter weather impact to the Core 30 (minus Honolulu) airports. Updated four times per day, the web display shows the potential impact to each airport through a matrix of color coded boxes that depict nominal (green), slight (yellow), moderate (orange), and high (red) impact through eighty-seven forecast hours. The impact information is calculated using the Short-Range Ensemble Forecast (SREF) numerical weather prediction system
 
AWC PIREP Online Submission FormPilot Reports (PIREPs) are reports of meteorological phenomena encountered in flight. These reports assist other pilots, dispatchers, and flight planners with flight plan preparation, situational awareness, and operational decision making. The PIREPs are integrated into the NWS forecast production process to help improve the accuracy of the forecasts, which include human generated products such as AIRMETs and SIGMETs as well as automated products such as the Graphical Turbulence Guidance (GTG), the Current Icing Product (CIP) and the Forecast Icing Product (FIP). PIREPs are particularly valuable in areas where surface-based observations are unavailable. The Aviation Weather Center PIREP online submission form enables registered users to enter PIREPs electronically, which will be distributed and displayed graphically on the Aviation Weather Center’s website www.aviationweather.gov. Users will be able to register at www.aviationweather.gov/user and submit their PIREPS at www.aviationweather.gov/airep/submit. All users will be subject to validation on the basis of having (1) an active pilot’s license (2) a .gov or .mil email address or (3) a group ID number for airlines. All other account requests will be evaluated on a case by case basis.
 
Beach Hazards StatementThe Beach Hazards Statement (BHS) informs beachgoers and local authorities to a multitude of hazards including, but not limited to: rip currents (or other types of dangerous currents in the surf zone), unusually cold water temperatures, potential for lightning along the beach/shoreline, or unusual surf/wave conditions which do not meet advisory criteria. In coordination with other agencies (as needed), the product may also inform users of various types of environmental hazards (e.g. chemical spills, harmful algal blooms, high bacteria levels in the water, or potentially hazardous marine wildlife which may be impacting the area). The BHS is an Informational Statement which is used to describe hazards that do not meet Advisory, Watch, or Warning criteria, as well as hazards that do not have Advisory, Watch, or Warning criteria (e.g. rip currents, oil spills). The BHS provides additional, more targeted information to its customers and partners on hazards along beach/coastal areas and immediate adjacent waters in a single statement. All hazards will not necessarily apply to all NWS coastal offices, as each office has unique criteria for their area of responsibility.
 
Blowing Dust Potential ProductThe Blowing Dust Potential graphical forecasts are designed to provide customers enhanced information on the potential for blowing dust (low, moderate, high, very high) to reduce visibilities below 1 statute mile during the next two days for areas in the Pendleton County Warning Area (CWA) prone to blowing dust (primarily the Columbia Basin and Blue Mountain Foothills).
 
Bulleted Coastal/Lakeshore Hazard Message (CFW) and Marine Weather Message (MWW)This displays the CFW and MWW in a bullet style format
 
Bulleted Winter Storm (WSW),Non-Precipitation (NPW), and FireWeather(RFW) StatementsDuring long duration winter storm, non-precipitation and fire events affecting multiple forecast zones, WSW, NPW and RFW weather watch, warning, advisory products (WWA) can become very long and time consuming for forecasters to produce. The length of the product can make it difficult for users to quickly scan multiple forecast zones for vital storm information. Since 2009, starting with WFO Reno (which developed the software template) and expanding each year to over 100 WFOs in 2011, an experimental bulleted template for descriptive text in place of paragraphs has been used to produce long duration WSW, NPW and RFW WWA products within the AWIPS Graphical Hazards Generator (GHG) software. As of AWIPS Build 9.3 now being implemented in the field, GHG contains a baseline operational version of the software.
 
California Fire Weather Web Page and Emergency Communications Center Dispatch Area (ECCDA) Forecast SummariesFor the past several year, land management and fire suppression agencies serving California have expressed a need for more generalized fire weather forecasts suitable for agency radio broadcasts from Emergency Communication Center Dispatch Area (ECCDA) offices. These twice-daily fire agency radio broadcasts are critical to relaying life saving information to fire fighting crews in the field. The ECCDA Forecast Summary is a methodology developed to fulfill this need.
 
CEILING HEIGHT AND SURFACE VISIBILITY INFORMATION ON THE MULTI-FORMAT FORECAST INFORMATION WEB PAGEAdvances in computer capabilities and web services technologies, as well as scientific advances in National Weather Service (NWS) software, have afforded an opportunity for the NWS to create ceiling height and surface visibility customer-based products and services. Information dissemination via the world wide web (www) allows customers to obtain higher resolution ceiling height and surface visibility information in a variety of formats on demand.
 
Center Weather Advisory (CWA)The National Weather Service's (NWS) Center Weather Advisory (CWA) is an aviation warning for conditions meeting or approaching national in-flight advisory criteria ( ie AIRMET, SIGMET, or SIGMET for convection) as described in NWSI 10-811.
 
Central Region Multimedia Weather BriefingThe Multimedia Weather Briefing (MWB) is an Internet-accessible multimedia file that provides information concerning hazardous weather events within the service area of a Central Region office. The MWB offers a combined visual/auditory platform for supporting the planning activities of emergency response partners and other key customers, as well as the general public by conveying forecaster reasoning and confidence concerning impending hazardous weather events, upcoming or current drought conditions, climate and hydrologic outlooks, etc. These briefings also serve as a means of communicating probabilities and other uncertainty information which can be used in risk reduction assessments which may impact preparations or actions made by our partners and customers
 
Changes to the criteria for issuing tropical cyclone watches and warnings to include certain land-threatening disturbances that are not yet tropical cyclones The National Weather Service (NWS) can now issue watches, warnings, and graphical and textual advisory products for disturbances that are not yet a tropical cyclone, but which pose the threat of bringing tropical storm or hurricane conditions to land areas within 48 hours. Under previous long standing NWS policy, the NWS has not been permitted to issue a hurricane or tropical storm watch or warning until after a tropical cyclone had formed.
 
Changes to the Hurricane Local StatementStartinf with the 2015 hurricane season, Southern and Eastern Region WFOs having HLS responsibility will issue the HLS as a non-segmented product with no VTEC for land areas only. A new WFO product, “Hurricane Local Watch/Warning Product”, is now being used to issue tropical cyclone watches and warnings for land areas. The Marine Weather Warning (MWW) product is being used for tropical cyclone watches and warnings for marine zones in a WFOs county warning area. There will not be any change in the format to the HLS for Western and Pacific Region offices which issue the product for the 2015 Hurricane Season, except tropical cyclone watches/warnings for marine zones would be moved to the MWW. Plans for expanding the revamped HLS to Western and Pacific Region offices are being developed with implementation TBD.
 
Changes to the Tropical Cyclone Public Advisory for 2015The current NWS operational guidelines state that NHC and CPHC will issue public advisories (TCPs) at 2-hourly intervals whenever coastal tropical cyclone watches / warnings are in effect and coastal radars are able to provide reliable hourly center position estimates. When NHC and CPHC is issuing TCPs on 2-hourly cycles, hourly position estimates are issued (on the hour between TCP issuance) in the Tropical Cyclone Update (TCU; prior to 2013, the Tropical Cyclone Position Estimate was issued in these cases) to provide a continuous flow of information regarding the center location of a tropical cyclone when the center can be easily track with land-based radar. Although NHC typically mentions in the Tropical Cyclone Discussion and indicates in the TCP when 2- versus 3-hourly advisories will be issued, the less frequently used 2-hourly advisory cycle sometimes creates confusion among our core partners. This agenda item proposes that NHC and CPHC always remain on a 3-hourly TCP cycle whenever watches / warnings are in effect or a tropical cyclone is over land at tropical storm strength or greater. The elimination of the 2-hourly TCP cycle would preserve the issuance of public advisories at standard times during an event whenever watches or warnings are in effect. This change would also keep the issuance of public advisories out of the interval when NHC and CPHC forecasters are preparing the next forecast (e.g., the 9 a.m. intermediate advisory “B” must be prepared and sent while the 11 a.m. forecast is being developed). Maintaining public advisories on a 3-hour cycle will alleviate workflow issues while the new track and intensity forecast is being prepared and wind and surge watches / warnings are being collaborated.
 
Changes to Tropical Cyclone Forecast Graphics and GIS FilesEffective on or about May 15, 2017, the appearance of the graphics accompanying tropical cyclone advisory packages issued by the National Hurricane Center (NHC) and Central Pacific Hurricane Center (CPHC) changeD. These changes are required for the NHC and CPHC to begin issuing forecasts and watches/warnings for potential tropical cyclones.three new Keyhole Markup Language (KML) files will be available and the wind speed probability Geographic Information System (GIS) files will be available at higher resolution.
 
CLIMAT Messages The program for the international exchange of monthly mean data is called the "CLIMAT" program. The World Data Center for Meteorology, operated by the National Climatic Data Center, collects CLIMAT messages for publication under WMO sponsorship.
 
Climate Diagnostics BulletinThe Climate Prediction Center (CPC) issues this monthly report on the status of the ocean-atmosphere climate system in the tropics and extratropics.
 
Coastal Waters Forecast ProductProvides marine weather information over the coastal waters - generally from the coastline out to between 20 and 60 miles from the coastline
 
Coastal/Lakeshore Flood Statement/Watch/WarningThe suite of products provides the public with statements, watches, and warnings of significant coastal/lakeshore flooding events.
 
Coded Marine ForecastProvides an abbreviated version of the Coastal Waters Forecast
 
Cold Advisory for Newborn Livestock (CANL) GraphicIn the winter of 2008-2009,NWS Glasgow ran this system. Due to significant livestock losses in other areas of the high plains during the winter of 2008-2009, additional NWS offices joined the experimental test period for the 2009-2010,2010-2011,and 2011-12 winter seasons including: WFO Aberdeen, SD WFO Billings, MT WFO Bismarck, ND WFO Glasgow, MT WFO Great Falls, MT WFO Pocatello, ID WFO Pendleton, OR Durint the 2011-2012 experimental test period, NWS surveyed other entities in the weather enterprise for their interest in providing this type of service to the livestock industry.
 
Collaborative Convective Forecast ProductThe Collaborative Convective Forecast Product (CCFP) is a graphical representation of expected convective occurrence at 2-, 4-, and 6-hours after issuance time. Convection is defined as a polygon of at least 3,000 square miles with coverage of at least 25% with echoes of at least 40 dbZ composite reflectivity and at least one echo top of 25,000 feet or greater. CCFP covers the contiguous 48 states and portions of Ontario and Quebec south of 48 degrees north latitude.
 
Collaborative Surf ProductSurf is the number one weather-related killer in Hawaii. More lives are lost to surf-related accidents every year in Hawaii than any other weather event. Between 1993 to 1997, 238 ocean drownings occurred and 473 people were hospitalized for ocean-related spine injuries, with 77 directly caused by breaking waves. This is a serious safety problem. The National Weather Service (NWS) Weather Forecast Office (WFO) in Honolulu wants to better serve the citizens of Hawaii and visitors to the islands who may not be familiar with ocean conditions. An evolving Collaborative Nearshore Swell and Wind Forecast for Oahu and improved web page will incorporate educational tools and forecast explanations for all levels of ocean-going customers. The collaborative nearshore swell and wind forecast will be disseminated to the public via the world wide web and other NWS dissemination methods, including the Family of Services and NOAA Weather Wire.
 
Convective SIGMETConvective Significant Meteorological Advisories (WST) is a text product describing the occurrence or expected occurrence of thunderstorms and related phenomena over the conterminous United States and adjacent coastal waters within 2 hours of issuance tim
 
Cook Inlet Sea Ice AnalysisAids ships navigating the ice-covered waters of Cook Inlet and into the Port of Anchorage
 
Crop Moisture Index.The Climate Prediction Center?s (CPC) and U.S. Department of Agriculture?s Joint Agricultural Weather Facility (JAWF) produces the Crop Moisture Index chart. The index indicates short term conditions.
 
Crosswind Calculator AidThe Crosswind Decision Aid is color-coded according to the degree of impact the wind will have on various runways green indicating little or no impact; yellow indicating marginal impact; and red indicating significant impact. Each color level is triggered based on a user-defined wind direction and wind speed threshold. The product also includes a Wet Runway/IFR factor that effectively lowers the crosswind speed thresholds.
 
Current Icing Product (CIP) SeverityThe Current Icing Product (CIP) is an automatically-generated index suitable for depicting areas of potentially hazardous airframe icing. This version of the CIP was updated in December 2006. The original CIP was implemented in 2002. The CIP algorithm is rooted in cloud physics principles that have been applied in the practical forecasting of icing probability and severity using research aircraft for nearly a decade. These principles and the resulting methods have also been applied to studies of icing incidents and accidents, as well as daily assessment of icing environments associated with icing pilot reports (PIREPs) over the United States and Canada at all times of the year.
 
D Region Absorption Prediction, Release 2The D-Region Absorption Prediction, Release 2 (D-RAP2) product provides a suite of graphic and text information about the global High Frequency (HF) radio propagation conditions related to the state of the ionosphere’s D-region. D-RAP2 will be web based (http://www.swpc.noaa.gov/drap/index.html) and is an enhancement of the current D Region Absorption Prediction product (http://www.swpc.noaa.gov/dregion/index.html). D-RAP2 fills a void that exists in the current product by providing absorption information due to energetic proton precipitation at high latitudes. The web site provides: o A main page containing a global map of the highest HF frequencies affected by a 1dB attenuation, estimated recovery times, and links to subordinate pages. o Subordinate pages containing: north and south polar maps of the highest frequencies affected by a 10dB attenuation, and ASCII tabular values of total absorption at 10 MHz. o DRAP2 is updated every minute SWPC data and products are designed to provide accurate and real-time space weather information for the safety and benefit of our customers
 
Day 4-8 Severe Weather Outlook GuidanceThe Day 4-8 Severe Weather Outlook product will consist of one graphic with an area (s) where severe weather is anticipated during the period. The severe weather threat areas will be depicted with a closed line and a label indicating the dates of the expected threat. A short 2-4 sentence paragraph will accompany the graphic to briefly describe the area depicted and occasionally describe the key reasons for the forecast. The forecast decision will be based on a variety of guidance information including the GFS, UKMET and ECMWF deterministic models, Medium Range (MREF) ensemble guidance and other statistical techniques.
 
Digital Wind and Wave Forecasts on Inland Lakes and ReservoirsWind and wave digital forecasts on inland lakes and reservoirs in text and graphical forecasts on the WFO web page. Wind and wave forecasts created within the GFE using the NOAA/GLERL wind/wave model.WInd wave forecasts for the lakes are produced using forecaster derived data.
 
Dry Lightning Potential IndexThe Dry Lightning Potential Index (DLPI) is a graphical product produced by forecasters at WFO Las Vegas (VEF) using GFE/IFPS. Ratings of Dry Lightning potential (numbered from 0 through 6) for the next three days (today, tomorrow and the next day) are calculated using forecasts of boundary layer relative humidity and static stability. The DLPI is intended to be used as general guidance, primarily for planning purposes. The DLPI is intended as a seasonal product, issued from June through October, when active wildfires are most likely to occur in our forecast area
 
Eastern Pacific Hurricane Season OutlookThe Climate Prediction Center (CPC) issues the Hurricane Outlook for the eastern Pacific east of 140? West. No outlook, however, can give certainty as to whether or not a particular locality will be impacted by a tropical storm or hurricane in any given year. CPC issues this outlook in cooperation with the Tropical Prediction Center and NOAA?s Hurricane Research Division.
 
Eastern Region National Digital Forecast Database (NDFD) Graphic Forecast DisplaysThe National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) National Weather Service (NWS) National Digital Forecast Database (NDFD) Graphic Forecast Displays (http://www.erh.noaa.gov/ndfd/graphical/sectors/ccc.php)where ccc is the WFO ID, are web-based presentations of digital forecast data originating from local Weather Forecast Office (WFO) digital databases. The data is displayed in a graphical form on a local scale.
 
El Nino/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) Diagnostic DiscussionThe Climate Prediction Center (CPC) issues this monthly bulletin to provide insight into climate outlooks by reviewing the potential effects of the ENSO.
 
Enhanced Product addition of Max Wind-Hail Size Coding Tag for Severe Thunderstorm Warnings and associated follow up staThe Central Region Severe Thunderstorm Warning (CR SVR) is an alphanumeric product providing short-fused warning in¬formation on hazardous conditions associated with thunderstorms which are expected to pose a threat to life and/or real property. This product is prepared by each National Weather Service (NWS) Weather Forecast Office (WFO) for their County Warning Area (CWA) of responsibility. Integrated Warning Team workshops, as well as several societal impacts groups, have indicated a desire by many emergency managers for a concise tag line on the end of the SVR product identifying maximum hail size and wind speeds expected for a given SVR warning. Local area sirens are typically alarmed for tornadoes only. Decoding this tag line will facilitate the capability for local area EMs to trigger sirens for particularly dangerous severe thunderstorm events when conditions exceed locally developed thresholds for thunderstorm induced wind and or hail size.
 
Enhanced Product Fire Weather Planning Forecast (FWF) Bullet Format A Fire Weather Forecast (FWF) that utilizes left-justified asterisks to begin each line of text. The asterisks help maintain proper word wrapping and indentations in the AWIPS text editor. This significantly reduces the amount of time needed to edit the product before dissemination.
 
Enhanced Product National Implementation of the use of 1 inch Diameter Hail CriteriaThe Severe Thunderstorm Warning (SVR) is an alphanumeric product providing short-fused warning in¬formation on hazardous conditions associated with thunderstorms which are expected to pose a threat to life and/or real property. This product is prepared by each National Weather Service (NWS) Weather Forecast Office (WFO) for their County Warning Area (CWA) of responsibility. In the Western Region (WR) and Central Region (CR) a Severe Thunderstorm Warning is currently being issued experimentally based on expectation of winds gusting to 58 mph or greater and/or hail of one (1) inch diameter or greater. Pending successful completion of this experiment, all NWS sites will issue Severe Thunderstorm Warnings based on these criteria.
 
Enhanced Winter Weather Guidance Product SuiteThe Hydrometeorological Prediction Center (HPC) proposes to produce probability guidance for three specific snow/sleet accumulation thresholds per forecast day out to Day 3. HPC will also generate separate probability graphics for the exceedance of freezing rain. In addition a single graphic will depict both HPC forecast position of significant surface low pressure centers over the contiguous U.S. and conveyance of uncertainty of the forecast position. This will be depicted in 12 hour increments out to Day 3.
 
Enhancement to National Spot Webpage: HYSPLIT Trajectories Request Function The Weather Forecast Office (WFO) NWS Spot webpages provide a nationally uniform portal for NWS customers to request, receive, and leave feedback for site specific spot forecasts. As of September 19, 2011, all WFO NWS Spot webpage hosted a new functionality for requesting HYSPLIT (Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated rajectorymodel) trajectory runs from NOAA’s Air Resources Laboratory (ARL) on an experimental basis. On October 20, 2013 this functionality became operational. Trajectory elements will be available based on the North American Mesoscale Model (NAM) for the CONUS and on the Global Forecast System (GFS) for Alaska and Hawaii. The HYSPLIT trajectories Request Function will allow users to request HYSPLIT trajectory runs at 500, 1500, and 3000 meters for the latitude/longitude of the spot request. The trajectory runs will begin at the specified ignition time on the spot request. To request HYSPLIT trajectories with a spot request, the user must enter the phrase ..."hysplit to requester email address" in the remarks section of the spot request form. The HYSPLIT trajectory raw data, as well as gif and kml files, will be sent to the specified email address.
 
Enhancement to the National Snow Analysis: NOHRC Snow Model and Forecast Products ExpansionThe NOHRSC is expanding the spatial domain of its gridded snow model into Canada to include the Great Lakes drainage area. Additionally, the NOHRSC is executing the model in a 72-hour forecast mode. The Rapid Refresh (RR) model forces the first 18 forecast hours and the North American Mesoscale (NAM) model forces the remaining 54 forecast hours.
 
Ensemble Trace plotCurrently the National Weather Service (NWS) River Forecast Centers (RFCs) and Weather Field Offices (WFOs) produce a wide variety of river forecasts, which indicate current and future river conditions. The Ensemble Trace Plot prepared by the North Central River Forecast center (NCRFC) will be issued as a Web page graphic. The graphic will be for the NCRFC?s area of responsibility. It will be issued once a month (after the Climate Prediction center (CPC) outlooks are released at mid-month). It will cover the three month period after the issuance (for example, graphic released around May 26 will cover June-August period).
 
Expected Value plotDescription: Currently the National Weather Service River Forecast Centers and Weather Forecast Offices produce a wide variety of river forecasts to indicate current and future river conditions. The Expected Value graphic indicates timing and confidence levels for forecast stages for a selected time-frame, generally 90 days. This would provide an overall range of expected hydrologic conditions based on computed probabilities. The Expected Value Graphic will be issued as a web-based graphic for NCRFC?s area of responsibility. It will be issued once a month after the Climate Prediction Center outlooks are released at mid-month to cover the ensuing three month period (i.e. graphic issued around May 26 will cover the period from June-August).
 
Experimental Graphical Forecasts for AviationIn May 2015 the National Weather Service received a formal request from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) for the NWS to cease production of textual Area Forecasts (FAs), contingent upon the provision of equivalent meteorological information in support of aviation.The Graphical Forecasts for Aviation include observations and forecasts valid for the continental United States. Observational data and warnings are time synchronized and available by the hour for the current time and the prior six hours. Hourly model data and forecasts, including National Digital Forecast Data (NDFD), are available to 15 hours in the future. Wind, icing and turbulence forecasts are available in 3000 ft. increments from the surface up to 18000 ft. MSL, and in 6000 ft. increments from 18,000 MSL to FL420 (42,000 ft. MSL). Turbulence forecasts are also broken into LO (below 18,000 MSL) and HI (at or above 18,000 MSL) graphics. A maximum icing graphic and maximum wind velocity graphic (regardless of altitude) are also available.Multiple fields of interest are combined in categories that the user is able to select from the top level Weather menu. The data for each category is determined by the time period, observations (current time and the prior six hours) and forecasts (valid up to 15 hours in the future). Additional information is available in text format when mouse-clicking on the map or using the hover function. The “Configure” menu enables the user to customize the satellite and radar displays in addition to choosing parameters for the observations and aviation advisories displayed. Imagery, observations, and forecast graphics are overlaid on high-resolution basemaps from ESRI, including colored relief, satellite and street views. Overlays include navigational aids, airports, and heliports for the entire United States. More detail is revealed as you zoom in and individual layers can be turned on or off independently.
 
Experimental Impact Based WarningsThis is an expansion of the NWS Experimental Central Region Impact Based Warning demonstration in 2012 and 2013.Severe Thunderstorm Warning (SVR), Tornado Warning (TOR) and Severe Weather Statement (SVS) products will be stratified into categories distinguishing extreme cases from base convective warnings. Additional enhanced wording will be included to convey information about associated impacts, specific hazards expected, and recommended actions, both within the bullet statements and as part of the tag line codes.Based on feedback from the Central Region 2013 Experimental Impact Based Warnings, the 2014 demonstration will include some changes. The most significant change for the 2014 national experiment is that the impact statements for “CONSIDERABLE” and “CATASTROPHIC” serve as markers of confidence of tornado occurrence, with both reflecting an “elevated tier” of tornado damage and risk. The term CATASTROPHIC will only be used when a tornado is striking an actual community. Issuing enhanced convective warnings in 2014 will be the 38 Central Region Weather Forecast Offices (WFOs), 5 WFOs within NWS Southern Region (Norman, OK; Tulsa, OK; Jackson, MS; Lubbock, TX and San Angelo, TX); 1 WFO within NWS Eastern Region (Blacksburg, VA); and 2 WFOs within NWS Western Region (Great Falls, MT and Glasgow, MT).
 
Extended Convective Forecast Product (ECFP)Automated probabilistic 24 hour thunderstorm outlook based on SREF Calibrated thunder guidance. This automated graphical forecast is created from the Short Range Ensemble Forecast (SREF) Calibrated Thunderstorm output. Contours are drawn at 40, 60, and 80% probability of “thunderstorm” (not convection) using CCFP-like shading. Hashed areas represent 40-59% probability, solid lined areas represent 60-79% probability, and solid blue filled areas represent greater than 80% probability. The automated graphic uses the 09Z initialization of the SREF valid for 18Z-00Z the next day
 
Extreme Wind Warning (EWW)The Extreme Wind Warning (EWW) is a text product prepared by the National Weather Service (NWS) Weather Forecast Offices (WFOs). The product warns of imminent or impending extreme winds associated with a landfalling hurricane.
 
Fire Weather OutlookElements in National Digital Forecast Database (NDFD)Two digital data elements in the NDFD, and associated web imagery, forecasting fire weather conditions, originating from the Storm Prediction Center: - Fire Weather Outlook Critical/Extremely Critical Areas (Days 1-7) - Fire Weather Outlook Critical Areas for Dry Thunderstorms (Days 1-3)
 
Fire Weather Planning Forecast (FWF) Text Format– Due to varied terrain, vegetation and climatology, the Fire Weather Planning Forecast (FWF) in the western U.S. requires varying amounts of forecaster editing following production of draft text from GFE formatters. This FWF text format utilizes left-justified asterisks to begin each line of text. The asterisks help maintain proper word wrapping and indentations in the AWIPS text editor, significantly reducing the amount of time needed to “post edit” the product before dissemination. The format change is accomplished through use of a FWF GFE formatter developed by Western Region.
 
Fire Weather Point Forecast Matrix Land management agencies in Georgia and North Carolina have expressed a need for easily accessible tabular forecast data that is tailored toward fire behavior applications. A fire weather version of the Point Forecast Matrix (PFM) table fits this need well because it allows agency specialists to quickly run simple fire behavior models for planning purposes. The product is called the Fire Weather Point Forecast Matrix (PFW) and is generated routinely for the National Fire Danger Rating System (NFDRS) sites or other areas as determined by the users. This additional data will help land management agencies to ensure the safety of fire crews as well as better plan prescribed burns and other projects in a cost and resource effective manner. Also, land managers have expressed a need for better tools to predict and manage smoke dispersion. They have also requested that the NWS include an Atmospheric Dispersion Index (ADI) and Low Visibility Occurrence Risk Index (LVORI) in the PFW product. WFO Fire Weather PFW’s are generated for the Remote Automated Weather Station (RAWS)/NFDRS sites using an edited version of the standard PFM formatter. This formatter produces needed fire weather parameters from the local WFO’s Digital Forecast Database (DFD). PFW's can be generated for any grid point in a DFD based upon user request. The web delivery of the product for fire weather customers will include a disclaimer at the top of the page stating “This product is for planning and review purposes only and is not to be substituted for an official fire weather spot forecast. The data displayed are calculated from a 5.0 by 5.0 km digital database and only approximates weather conditions in highly varying terrain. Please relay any comments you have to your local NWS office. An example of the PFW can be seen at: http://www.srh.noaa.gov/productview.php?pil=GSPPFWGSP .
 
Fire Weather Threat 4-Panel GraphicThe Fire Weather Threat 4-Panel Graphic displays on the Internet several parameters that are critical for fire weather. In the upper left corner of the graphic is a ?Red Flag Risk Index? based on forecast minimum relative humidity (RH) and forecast maximum sustained wind. In the upper right hand corner is the Red Flag Risk Index for the current hour based on the GFE RH and wind observation database. In the lower left corner is the Haines Threat Index based on the forecast high level Haines Index and forecast minimum relative humidity. A second graphic is available based on the Forecast Haines Index and the current relative humidity from the GFE observation database. In the lower right hand panel three graphics reside. The probability of 25% or lower RH, 15% or lower RH, and the current observed RH.
 
Fire Weather Watch/Warning DisplayThe Fire Weather "Red Flag" Watch/Warning Display provides an HTML visual display of all fire weather "Red Flag" watch/warnings that are currently in effect across the western U.S.
 
Five Day Sea Ice ForecastForecast sea ice conditions over the waters surrounding Alaska valid at the day five period.
 
Flash Flood Potential IndexThe Flash Flood Potential Index (FFPI) is a text product produced by forecasters at the WFO SGX and WFO LOX using objective forecasts techniques based upon model data. Ratings of flash flood potential (numbers 0 through 4) for the next two days (today and tomorrow or tomorrow and the next day - depending on the issuance time) are calculated using precipitable water, winds aloft (700 mb), and forecaster knowledge of other atmospheric factors such as stability and atmospheric capping. The FFPI is issued during flash flood season from June 1st through September 30th.
 
Flash Flood Potential RatingThe Flash Flood Potential Rating (FFPR) is both a text and graphical product produced by forecasters at the WFO SLC using GFE/IFPS. Ratings of flash flood potential (numbers 1 through 6) for the next two days (today and tomorrow or tomorrow and the next
 
Forecast Icing Potential (FIP)The Forecast Icing Potential (FIP) product is an automatically-generated forecast index of icing potential developed by the In-Flight Icing Product Development Team sponsored by the Federal Aviation Administration?s Aviation Weather Research Program.
 
Forecast of Reference Crop Evapotranspiration (FRET) for Short Canopy VegetationFRET is the expected depth of water (in hundredths of inches) that would evaporate and transpire from a reference crop under the forecast weather conditions on a daily and weekly basis over the next 7 days. The FRET is for short crops with an approximate height of 12 cm similar to full cover grasses. Daily FRET grids for the next 7 days, total FRET grids for the 7-day period, FRET departure from normal grids, and climatology grids for reference evapotranspiration are available via a web page interface for the nation via the NDFD.An ETT text product composed of a supplemental table generated from the gridded data is available at: http://www.nws.noaa.gov/view/validProds.php?prod=ETT
 
GIS Compatible NDFD Data on the WFO Internet PageNOAAs National Weather Service (NWS) Weather Forecast Offices (WFOs) produce graphical forecasts for the National Digital Forecast Database (NDFD). The NDFD forecasts are available to the public in GRIB2 format, a World Meteorological Organization standard. Unfortunately, this format is not widely used outside of the meteorological community. In this project GRIB2 files from the MFR county warning and forecast area are converted to shapefile format and posted to the internet webpage.
 
Global Tropics Hazards/ Benefits AssessmentThe Global Tropics Hazards/Benefits Assessment, issued by the Climate Prediction Center (CPC), provides an outlook for the upcoming week 1 and week 2 time periods for areas expecting extensive and persistent enhanced / suppressed rainfall and regions where conditions are especially favorable / unfavorable for tropical cyclogenesis.
 
GovDelivery Southeast River Forecast Center (SERFC) Subscription ServiceGovDelivery is a subscription service that serves as an efficient means of notifying partners of the issuance of critical SERFC products. GovDelivery specializes in the unique distribution of government information, and currently has contracts in place with many other state and federal agencies, including FEMA.
 
Graphical - Weather Story of the DayThe Graphical "Weather Story of the Day" is a graphical representation (product) which depicts the most important weather feature in the forecast area of responsibility of individual NWS Weather Forecast Offices (WFO). The "Weather Story of the Day" is not time dependent. That is, the product depicts the most significant weather feature through the 7-day forecast period. A graphical user interface allows the forecaster to include a brief text, a few sentences in length, describing the "Weather Story of the Day" graphical product.
 
Graphical Airman 's Meteorological Advisory (G-AIRMET)The graphical Airman’s Meteorological Advisory (G-AIRMET) is a BUFR-formatted time-series depiction of aviation hazards occurring with occasional or greater frequency throughout the conterminous U.S. and adjacent coastal waters (NWS, 2005a). G-AIRMET is available to users via the aviationweather.gov Internet web site. This product provides a graphical depiction of the standard AIRMET text product from AWC, and covers the CONUS only
 
Graphical Aviation Time SeriesThe National Weather Service's (NWS) Graphical Aviation Time Series (GATS) is an optional product displaying a time series of various weather elements important to aviation. The weather elements displayed in time series format include, but may not be restricted to, temperature, dew point, relative humidity, heat index, wind chill, altimeter setting, wind direction, wind speed, wind gust, ceiling height, visibility, and precipitation. These time-series graphs are created by downloading 5-minute ASOS observations once each hour, with a 24-hour floating window of data available.
 
Graphical Convective Outlook for the Alaska FIR The Alaska Aviation Weather Unit (AAWU) issues area forecasts that include thunderstorm information for each zone. These forecasts contain information as to the timing and some detail in a text format. This new product would provide this information in a graphical format. It will be the convective guidance for 0-12 and 12-24-hour time periods. Included are areas where convection will occur as isolated, scattered, or numerous. Severe convection potential would be outlined. Other details such as the thunderstorm bases and tops, timing of development, and some graphical reasoning indicated.
 
Graphical Forecast TableThe National Weather Service's (NWS) Graphical Forecast Table provides a graphical representation of digital/tabular forecasts of maximum temperature, minimum temperature, probability of precipitation, 3- hourly temperatures,dewpoint temperatures, relative humidity, sky condition, wind direction and speed,obstruction to visibility, and precipitation type.
 
Graphical Hazardous Weather OutlookThe Graphical Hazardous Weather Outlook will display graphically on the internet the weather hazards for the WFO County Warning Area (CWA) for 24 hour periods beginning with the current day and continuing through day 7. It is intended to supplement the Hazardous Weather Outlook text product.
 
Graphical Local Hazardous Weather OutlookThe National Weather Service has implemented a daily Hazardous Weather Outlook (HWO) text product. Its main focus is identifying all potential weather hazards during the next 24 hour time frame. The Local Hazardous Weather page ismeant to build off of the HWO text product, providing a more detailed aerial graphical depiction of the threat type and coverage.
 
Graphical Milepost ForecastThe Graphical Milepost Forecast allows the user to check the forecast in either meteogram or table format for the next 24 hours at mileposts along all major highways across the Pendleton CWA.
 
Graphical Severe Weather WarningsThe Graphical Severe Weather Warning (GSWW) combines the polygon generated by WARNGEN for a TOR or SVR issuance with a current radar reflectivity image, high-detail GIS map backgrounds showing roads, cities, and terrain, and a summary of demographic information for the population at risk. The GSWW also contains the text of the warning and any subsequent SVSs issued for that warning....
 
Graphical Short Term Forecast Product GraphiCastThe Graphical Short Term Forecast Product (GraphiCast) is a graphical representation of the short term weather forecast (0 to 6 hours) in the forecast area of responsibility of individual NWS Weather Forecast Offices (WFO). It depicts current radar, satellite, or observation imagery with graphical and text annotations showing forecast weather conditions in the next several hours. In rapidly developing situations, it is updated at least hourly.
 
Graphical Tropical Weather Outlook This document describes the Graphical Tropical Weather Outlook (TWO) produced by the National Hurricane Center (NHC) for the Atlantic and Eastern Pacific Hurricane basins and by the Central Pacific Hurricane Center (CPHC) for the Central Pacific Hurricane basin. This product is a visual companion product to the text TWO. The following changes have been made for effective May 15 for NHC Products and June 1 for CPHC Products: NHC:1. The current location of all active tropical cyclones will be included on the 5-day GTWO. 2. The current location of potential tropical cyclones will be included on the 2-day and 5-day GTWO. 3. The current location of the potential tropical cyclones will be depicted by an x, with the number of the potential cyclone (e.g., One) displayed above the x. The x will be color coded based on the forecast likelihood of tropical cyclone formation during the 2- or 5-day period corresponding to that graphic: - Yellow, 30 percent or less chance - Orange, 40-60 percent chance - Red, 70 percent or greater chance A swath showing the forecast development area of the potential tropical cyclone will not be shown on the 5-day GTWO to avoid confusion with the existing 5-day track forecasts that will be provided for those systems. 4. The current location of potential tropical cyclones will not be included in the shapefile that accompanies each issuance of the GTWO. Users will be directed to the shapefiles accompanying the full forecast advisory for potential tropical cyclones. The forecast advisory shapefiles will include the current location and forecast track of the potential tropical cyclone. CPHC:Beginning on or around June 1, 2017, the Central Pacific Hurricane Center (CPHC) will expand its 2-Day Tropical Weather Outlook (TWO) to 5 days. CPHC will also introduce a 5-Day Graphical Tropical Weather Outlook (GTWO) graphic in addition to 2-Day graphic already available. These changes will allow all NWS TWO and GTWO products to have the same valid times and formats. The 5-Day TWO from CPHC will provide a current assessment in plain language of areas of disturbed weather and their potential for tropical formation over the next 120 hours for the central Pacific basin. Like the 2-Day TWO, the new 5-Day TWO will provide probabilistic information, in 10-percent increments, about a system's potential for developing into a tropical cyclone. The forecast and discussion will be provided on a disturbance-by-disturbance basis for both the 2-day and 5-day periods for the central Pacific basin.
 
Graphical Turbulence GuidanceThe Graphical Turbulence Guidance (GTG) is an automatically generated turbulence product that predicts the location and intensity of turbulence over the continental United States (CONUS).
 
Grassland Fire Danger Index for the Kansas PlainsThe Grassland Fire Danger Index (GFDI) product/service is a text and graphical representation of the Grassland Fire Danger Index values that correspond to the likelihood that fires will get out of control. Three-hourly GFDI values will be represented, giving customers a clear indication of not only the index value but also the time and duration of the values at a specific grid location
 
Great Lakes Break-up Outlook ProductIssued in March. Provides guidance on when any ice remaining on the Great Lakes will dissipate.
 
Great Lakes Ice OutlookIssued during winter. Provides guidance on expected ice growth and decay on the Great Lakes.
 
Gridded Day 2 and Day 3 Excessive Precipitation ForecastThe Gridded Day 2 and Day 3 Excessive Precipitation Forecasts are display the probability of precipitation amounts exceeding the flash flood guidance values issued by the River Forecast Centers at the time of product issuance. The product displays areas for the continental United States where the probability of precipitation amounts exceeding flash flood guidance is slight (defined as threat in the range 5 percent to less than 10 percent), moderate (defined as threat from 10 percent to less than 15 percent), and high (defined as threat 15 percent or greater). The River Forecast Centers do not currently issue flash flood guidance for days 2 and 3 so at this time the product will be based on the day 1 flash flood guidance.
 
Gridded Graphical Hazardous Weather OutlookThe Melbourne Weather Forecast Office (WFO) Gridded Graphical Hazardous Weather Outlook (gHWO) complements the text Hazardous Weather Outlook (HWO) by providing a graphical depiction of threat levels for the following hazards: lightning, tornado, wind, hail, (flash) flood, excessive heat, excessive cold, high wind, dense fog/smoke, fire weather, rip current, coastal flood, waterspout, marine wind/sea, and marine thunderstorm gust. The threat impacts are specific to the WFO county warning area (CWA) and marine area of responsibility (MAOR), and depict the geographical distribution and level of threat of each hazard.
 
Gridded Significant Wave Heights from the National CentersThe traditional format for the significant wave height products from the National Centers are graphical depictions of the observed and forecast wind-driven waves for the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans adjacent to the coasts of the Continental United States (US) and extending south over the Caribbean Sea and the west coast of Central America. These graphical products have been prepared for many years in the raster format by the Ocean Prediction Center (OPC) and the National Hurricane Center’s (NHC) Tropical Analysis and Forecast Branch (TAFB) and transmitted via radiofax and the internet. The production and dissemination of the traditional raster format for the graphical significant wave height products from the OPC and TAFB will continue. The gridded products are prepared for the initial wave heights and the 24 hour and 48 hour forecast wave heights in Gridded Binary (GRIB2) format. The gridded products are disseminated by the National Weather Service (NWS) Telecommunications Gateway to the Weather Forecast Offices (WFOs), National Centers, and other users. Users may also access these products via the internet at: ftp://ftp.mpc.ncep.noaa.gov/grids/operational/waves/atl ftp://ftp.mpc.ncep.noaa.gov/grids/operational/waves/pac
 
Gridded Weather Input for Fire Area Simulation Model (FARSITE)FARSITE is a deterministic model developed and used by land management agencies. FARSITE simulates the spatial and temporal spread and behavior of fires under conditions of heterogeneous terrain, fuels, and weather. Required FARSITE weather input consists of maximum and minimum relative humidity, maximum and minimum temperature, daily precipitation, wind speed and direction and cloud cover. FARSITE is an important tool that fire agencies use to help keep firefighters safe. Pursuant to the NWS mission of saving lives and property, NOAA/NWS forecasters have been manually supplying FARSITE weather input to fire managers for a number of years.
 
Hawaiian One-Month and Three-Month Outlooks and Discussion.The Climate Prediction Center (CPC) issues a one-month and a series of thirteen three-month temperature and precipitation outlooks for selected cities in Hawaii and an accompanying prognostic discussion.
 
Hazard Grids in the National Digital Forecast DatabaseThe NWS provides access to operational and experimental gridded forecasts of weather elements (e.g., maximum temperature, sky cover)through the NDFD. The NDFD contains a seamless mosaic of digital forecasts from NWS field offices working in collaboration with the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP). The hazard grids are prepared by all Weather Forecast Offices (WFO) and are available via the NDFD. Hazard grids are valid for more than two hours. The hazard grids depict all active long duration watch, warning and advisory hazards issued by NWS WFOs . The hazard grids include long duration coastal, marine, nonprecipitation, tropical and winter weather hazards. It also includes convective and some hydrological watches. It does not include the following short duration warnings: Tornado Warning, Severe Thunderstorm Warning, Extreme Wind Warning, Flash Flood Warning, and Special Marine Warning. It does not include the following Long Duration Watches and Warnings issued in RiverPro and WarnGen:Flood Watch for forecast points, Areal Flood Warnings and Flood Warnings for forecast points. In addition, it initially will not include Gale Warnings, Storm Warnings and Hurricane Force Wind Warnings issued in the Offshore and High Seas forecast by OPC and TAFB. The NDFD Hazard grid definition is defined as,a weather or hydrologic hazardous event issued for the protection of life and property and the enhancement of the national economy. The Hazards grid will be in experimental status in the NWS Alaska Region until further notice.
 
Helicopter Emergency Medical Services (HEMS) ToolThe Helicopter Emergency Medical Services (HEMS) Tool is an interactive online display that can overlay multiple fields of interest: ceiling, visibility, flight category, winds, relative humidity, temperature, icing, satellite, radar (base and composite reflectivity), G-AIRMETs, SIGMETs, METARs, TAFs, and PIREPs.All 3D data are interpolated to AGL altitudes and can be sliced horizontally on 1000 ft intervals up to 5000 ft. All data is time synchronized to go back up to 6 hours and forward up to 6 hours. The tool has high-resolution basemaps from ESRI, including colored relief, satellite and street views. Overlays include navigational aids, airports, and heliports for the entire United States. More detail is revealed as you zoom in and individual layers can be turned on or off independently. The HEMS Tool was specifically designed in response to a request by the Federal Aviation Administration to meet the needs of first responders who conduct short-distance, low-altitude flights.
 
High Seas ForecastDescribes potentially hazardous weather across large areas of the open ocean.
 
High Surf AdvisoryProvides notification of potentially life threatening surf conditions
 
HotSeat Warning SimulatorHotSeat is a web-based warning simulation tool. It uses archived WSR-88D data from actual events along with severe weather reports and damage survey photographs in a displaced real-time (DRT) mode to approximate the feel of issuing severe weather warnings in the National Weather Service. Upon completion of each event, the participant receives a score indicating his/her success in the simulation.
 
Hourly Multi-Sensor Precipitation Estimate Web-Based ServiceThe National Weather Service (NWS) collects rainfall data to support its forecast and warning operations. Individual River Forecast Centers (RFCs) and Weather Forecast Offices (WFOs) typically provide rainfall collectives in text and graphical formats for their areas of responsibility. This service provides unified hourly precipitation estimates for the Continental US and the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico on the Internet. The service includes graphics that display these precipitation data, as well as the ability to download the information in shapefile format for seven days post-event. This suite of graphics includes precipitation estimates for the last 1, 3, 6, 12, 24, 48, and 72 hourly accumulations, as well as "since 12z" accumulations. Hourly archives will be maintained.
 
Hours of Sunshine and Percent of Possible Sunshine ProductsThe Hours of Sunshine and Percent of Possible Sunshine Products will be graphical displays on the Internet of the number of hours of sunshine expected and the percent of total possible sunshine expected across the (PDT) County Warning Area (CWA). The products will be updated with each major Zone Forecast issuance. At 4 AM local Pacific Time, the forecasts will be for today and tomorrow. At 3 PM local Pacific Time, the forecasts will be for tomorrow and the day after tomorrow.
 
HPC 6hr Interval Quantitative Precip Forecast for days 4 and 5This Product provide QPF forecasts for days 4 and 5 in six hour increments. HPC forecasters prepare forecasts for 6hr periods out three days. In addition HPC forecasters prepare a 48hr forecast for days 4 and 5. Several RGCs have requested that HPC provide the day 4 and 5 forecasts in six hour increments rather than one 48 hr increment.This will augment the current 48 hr forecast prepared by HPC.
 
HPC Probabilistic Freezing Temperature ChartsThis product provides a probability that the temperature at a location will fall below 32 degrees Fahrenheit. This product is derived from the NDFD temperature grid data and the 2 meter temperature grid spread data from the GFS ensemble.
 
HPC Probabilistic Quantitative Precipitation ForecastsThis product provides a probabilistic forecast of rainfall over the continental U.S. in six hour increments.
 
HPC Probabilistic Winter Precipitation GuidanceThe Probabilistic Winter Precipitation Forecasts (PWPF) show the probability of various amounts of snow or freezing rain. They are based on the deterministic Hydrometeorological Prediction Center (HPC) Winter Weather Desk (WWD) accumulation forecasts, but are generated automatically using an ensemble of model forecasts along with the WWD forecasts
 
HPC Today's National Weather Chart in SpanishThis product is a Spanish language version of the HPC National Forecast Chart providing an overview of today’s national weather with an emphasis on hazardous and significant weather
 
Hurricane Local Watch/Warning ProductThe Hurricane Local Watch/Warning product is a segmented, automated product, with each segment being a discrete zone, containing tropical cyclone watches/warnings in effect, meteorological information, hazards (rain, storm surge, wind, tornadoes) and their potential impacts, and preparedness information at the Weather Forecast Office (WFO) level. The product is intended to be parsed by the weather enterprise. For 2015, the proposal is are for the Hurricane Local Watch/Warning Product to become the operational WFO flagship product for disseminating tropical cyclone watches/warnings for the Atlantic hurricane basin when a tropical cyclone affects land areas of their county warning area
 
Hurricane/Typhoon Local Statement (HLS)Starting with the 2015 hurricane season, Southern and Eastern Region WFOs having HLS responsibility will issue the HLS as a non-segmented product with no VTEC for land areas only. A new WFO product, “Hurricane Local Watch/Warning Product”, is now being used to issue tropical cyclone watches and warnings for land areas. The Marine Weather Warning (MWW) product is being used for tropical cyclone watches and warnings for marine zones in a WFOs county warning area. There will not be any change in the format to the HLS for Western and Pacific Region offices which issue the product for the 2015 Hurricane Season, except tropical cyclone watches/warnings for marine zones would be moved to the MWW. Plans for expanding the revamped HLS to Western and Pacific Region offices are being developed with implementation TBD.The HLS is an alphanumeric product alerting the public of present and anticipated local tropical cyclone affects. Coastal and selected inland Weather Forecast Offices issue HLSs when their County Warning Area and adjacent coastal waters is affected by a tropical cyclone watch/warning or evacuation orders.
 
Hydrologic Short-Term Meteorological Model-based Ensemble Forecasting System (MMEFS)The National Weather Service (NWS) Meteorological Model Ensemble River Forecasts web pages, graphics and text products are being produced by Eastern Region River Forecast Centers (RFCs) and the Southeast RFC to provide useful hydrologic information to users. The objective of this information is to provide short lead-time (<7 days) ensemble river forecasts using forcing fields provided by various meteorological ensemble systems.The purpose of the ensemble river forecasts is to provide users with a short-term (<7 days) situational awareness by providing the probabilistic exceedence information relative to NWS flood categories and providing the ensemble river forecasts that in turn show a range of outcomes. These web pages complement information contained in the current short-term deterministic hydrologic forecasts and internal NWS WFO-requested subjective contingency forecasts. This service will support the NOAA mission goals of serving society’s need for weather and water information and supporting the nation’s commerce, economy, and planning for the protection of life and property.
 
Ice Accumulation Grids Effective Wednesday, October 15, 2014, at 1400 Coordinated Universal Time (UTC), the NDFD Ice Accumulation forecast grids will be extended in time from 48 hours to 72 hours. Six-Hour Ice Accumulation grids: The expected new ice accretion on all exposed surfaces (in hundredths of inches) during a 6 hour period. Issuance: An ice accumulation grid will be specified whenever at least a trace of ice accumulation is forecast for any hour during a valid period. Valid periods for the NDFD begin and end at 0600, 1200, 1800, and 0000 UTC.
 
IFPS Digital Forecast PageThe IFPS Digital Forecast Page provides an interface for the public to access weather information from the NWS gridded forecast (IFPS) database. The gridded forecast is maintained 24/7 by all 24 Western Region Forecast Offices as part of the national NWS IFPS program.
 
Instant Messaging for NWS and Partners :NWSChatInstant Messaging (IM) is a real-time, Internet-based method of electronic communication between two or more parties. IM may also be referred to as "chat". Utilizing a software application known as a "chat client", multiple users can compose and send messages to each other in forums known as "chat rooms." In addition to manually composed mesages, chat sessions may contain various automated software-generated messages that convey information about disseminated National Weather Service (NWS) products. NWSChat is the name for the system providing IM capability to the NWS. NWSChat consists of hardware and software maintained by NWS and client software that can be accessed via a web browser or downloaded on the users computer.
 
International Tsunami Products for the Pacific BasinThe International graphical and statistical tsunami threat information product will be disseminated by the PTWC via email to a country’s designated Tsunami Warning Focal Point (TWFP) to support decision-making by that country’s tsunami warning organization. The email will also contain the accompanying international Tsunami Threat text messages (WEPA40). The tsunami warning organization may use the PTWC information as primary or supplemental guidance for determining their level of alert, and is responsible for issuing applicable alert levels such as warnings and watches to its own emergency management and stakeholder agencies, and/or the public.
 
Lightning Potential IndexThe Lightning Potential Index (LPI) is a web graphic that displays an index of lightning potential for various parts of the day, with a second day for planning purposes. This product will be issued routinely in the morning and updated as necessary.
 
Lightning Strike Density ProductThe Lightning Strike Density product is a gridded and graphical depiction of the density of lightning strikes. Units for the gridded product (GRIB2) as per WMO requirement are in SI units and are (number of strikes) m-2 sec-1 . These units require a scaling factor of 10 11 (11 is an exponent) to convert to km-2 min-1. The gridded forms are written to 8 km x8 km resolution and are generated in 15 and 30 min collectives. The lightning strike density product is based on the ground based Vaisala GLD360 global lightning network and is capable of detecting cloud-to-ground strokes, cloud-to-ground flash information and survey level cloud lightning information. Lightning Strike Density, as opposed to display of individual strikes, highlights the location of lightning cores and trends of increasing and decreasing activity. It is also a parameter that is useful to compare cloud to ground capabilities from different sources of lightning data.
 
Local NWS Facebook Pages Facebook, the largest of the social media sites, is a social networking web site where users can connect and interact with other people, organizations, and businesses. NWS will be using local and national facebook pages as a supplemental channel to experimentally disseminate environmental information and promote weather awareness activities including outreach and educational efforts
 
Low Flow Probabilistic forecastCurrently the National Weather Service (NWS) River Forecast Centers (RFCs) and Weather Field Offices (WFOs) produce a wide variety of river forecasts, which indicate current and future river conditions. The Low Flow Probabilistic Forecasts prepared by the North Central River Forecast Center (NCRFC) will be issued as Web page graphics. The graphics will be for the NCRFCs area of responsibility. They will be issued once a month (after the Climate Prediction Center (CPC) outlooks are released at mid-month). They will cover the three month period after the issuance (for example, graphics released around May 26 will cover June-August period).
 
Marine Forecast MatrixThe National Weather Service (NWS) Marine Forecast Matrix (MFM) provides a tabular forecast of wind direction and speed, swell direction and height, wind wave height, significant wave height, cloud cover, probability of precipitation, and areal precipitation coverage.
 
Marine Weather Discussion (MWD)Plain language free text discussion of computer model trends which focuses on expected wind and sea conditions. The MWD is used as a coordination vehicle among the national centers and coastal Weather Forecast Offices.
 
Marine Weather MessageThe Marine Weather Warning (MWW) product is a text bulletin intended to better inform mariners of adverse nonprecipitation conditions. It will also provide consistency of the National Weather Service (NWS) Coastal Weather Forecasts (CWFs), Great Lakes Open Lakes Forecasts (GLFs) and Great Lakes near shore forecasts (NSHs) with other NWS programs (winter weather, hydrologic, nonprecipitation and coastal hazards).
 
Marine Weather Statement (MWS)Plain language free text discussion of potentially hazardous warning conditions associated with non-severe thunderstorms and/or waterspouts issued on an event driven basis from WFOs. The product is also issued to advise of potential hazardous conditions with wind, waves, visibility, low water levels, hazardous materials spills, volcanic ash, and ice.
 
Maximum Tropical Cyclone Wind Speed Probability TableThe WSP shows the probability that maximum 1-minute wind speed forecast for the tropical cyclone will be within one of seven intensity ranges/storm classifications through 72 hours. The maximum 1-minute wind speed forecasts correspond to the wind speed forecasts in the Tropical Cyclone Forecast/Advisories (TCM) product. The probabilities are based on National Hurricane Center (NHC) forecasts from 1988-1997. NHC issues this experimental product for tropical cyclones in the Atlantic and Eastern Pacific basins. This experimental product is also issued for subtropical storms.
 
Maximum/Minimum Relative Humidity NDFD Grid Daily Maximum Relative Humidity and Minimum Relative Humidity grids are available in the NDFD on an operational basis. These elements are available for the entire U.S. including Alaska and Hawaii. The elements are automatically derived from existing Weather Forecast Office (WFO) hourly temperature and hourly dew point grids. Maximum Relative Humidity is calculated from 06Z to 18Z, and Minimum Relative Humidity is calculated from 18Z to 06Z.
 
Meteorological Impact Statement (MIS)The National Weather Service's (NWS) Meteorological Impact Statement (MIS) is a unscheduled flow control and flight operations planning forecast.  The MIS is valid 2-12 hours after issuance time and details weather conditions expected to adversely impact
 
Minneapolis TRACON Collaborative Convective Forecast ProductThe Minneapolis TRACON forecast product/service will be a collaborative effort by personnel of WFO Minneapolis, CWSU Minneapolis and initially, Northwest Airlines to produce a forecast of thunderstorm and/or lightning activity within a radius of 100 nautical miles of the center of the Minneapolis airport.
 
Mixed Case Letters in WFO Text Products Many NWS partners and users have identified the need for NWS text products to be provided in mixed case letters and to include an expanded punctuation and character set. Previously, national Public Information Statements (PNSs), including national Service Change Notices (SCNs) and national Technical Implementation Notices (TINs), were provided in mixed case letters with an expanded punctuation/character set for a risk reduction effort using non-operational products: (http://www.weather.gov/os/notification/scn10-28mixed_case.txt).
 
Modeled Soil Saturation IndexIn meeting its hydrologic forecast responsibilities, the National Weather Service (NWS) Missouri Basin River Forecast Center (MBRFC) simulates soil moisture across the Missouri River basin in real-time. The Modeled Saturation Index (MSI) quantifies the relative degree of tension water saturation present within the soil column, and is calculated on a sub-basin level. The primary product is a graphical display of the MSI across the Missouri River basin. Soil moisture directly impacts runoff potential, water resource management, debris flow formation, and agricultural productivity. A correlation exists between soil moisture and lower level atmospheric conditions. However, observed real-time soil moisture data is sparse and difficult to spatially interpolate. The production of the MSI graphic will enable the user to visualize the real-time relative degree of tension water saturation present geographically across the Missouri River basin
 
Mountain Pass ForecastThe Mountain Pass Forecast allows customers to check the forecast for significant highway passes for the next three days. Passes were chosen for this product based upon the frequency of calls to the WFO concerning weather at the pass and potential for impacts to travelers and commerce.The forecast consists of a text product that can be accessed via a web page
 
Mountain Recreational Point ForecastsThe Mountain Recreational Point Forecasts complements the official narrative text recreational forecasts that have long been issued by WFO Burlington, and in similar forms by other WFOs across the country. The web based display leverages the Google Maps interface to allow the user to readily access the specific mountain peak forecasts available. The WFO Burlington Mountain Recreational Forecast program serve a public safety purpose by providing weather forecasts for the highest elevations across the region, which are frequently impacted by severe and life-threatening weather that is not experienced at the lower elevations
 
MULTI-FORMAT FORECAST INFORMATION WEB PAGEAdvances in computer capabilities and web services technologies, as well as scientific advances in National Weather Service (NWS) software, have afforded an opportunity for NWS to create customer-based products and services.
 
MULTI-FORMAT MARINE FORECAST INFORMATION WEB PAGEAdvances in computer capabilities and web services technologies, as well as scientific advances in National Weather Service (NWS) software, have afforded an opportunity for NWS to create customer-based marine products and services. Information dissemination via the World Wide Web (www) allows customers to obtain higher resolution marine forecast information in a variety of formats on demand.
 
Multi-Format Marine Forecast Information Web Page for Coastal WFOsAdvances in computer capabilities and web services technologies, as well as scientific advances in National Weather Service (NWS) software, have afforded an opportunity for NWS to create customer-based marine products and services. Information dissemination via the World Wide Web (WWW) allows customers to obtain higher resolution marine forecast information in a variety of formats on demand. This version of an interactive marine forecast information web page is being made available to (1) allow users to access marine forecast information that is always current with higher resolution than is possible in traditional text marine forecast products which are averaged over time and space; (2) allow marine customers to view marine forecast information retrieved directly from locally prepared, gridded forecast database in a variety of formats, including icons, text, tabular, and graphic; and (3) receive feedback from users regarding potential refinements to interactive information retrieval and display
 
Multimedia Weather BriefingThe Multimedia Weather Briefing is an Internet-accessible multimedia file that provides information concerning hazardous weather events within the service area of a Southern Region office. The briefing provides a medium for supporting the planning activities of emergency response partners and customers by conveying (both aurally and visually, in non-technical terms) the forecaster's reasoning and confidence concerning upcoming hazardous weather events.
 
National Spot Forecast Webpage NWS Spot is a website where NWS customers can request a spot forecast. The customer answers form questions on the website and then the website will compose an STQ text product that is sent to the AWIPS of the Forecast Office that is required to write the forecast. The forecast is generally composed on AWIPS as an FWS text product and transmitted like any other text product that is issued by the forecast office. The NWS Spot website databases these FWS products. Each FWS product includes a “.TAG” line, which helps the NWS Spot website associate each forecast request with a completed forecast. Spot forecasts are a critical mission of the National Weather Service. These forecasts are needed (for example) for those fighting wildfires, conducting prescribed burns, cleaning up HAZMAT incidents (like deepwater horizon), for search and rescue operations, and other critical operations, as needed.
 
National Air Quality forecast System (AQFS) Ozone (03) forecastA web-based presentation of gridded forecast O3 guidance originating from the Environmental Modeling Center (EMC) of the National Environmental Prediction (NCEP). The ozone data is displayed for a domain covering the northeast US for 1-hour and 8-hour averages.
 
National Air Quality Forecast System (AQFS) Smoke Forecast Graphic DisplayThe National Weather Service?s National Air Quality Forecast System (AQFS) Wildland Fire Smoke Forecast (WFSF) Experimental Graphic Display is a web-based presentation of gridded forecast smoke dispersion guidance produced by NOAA's Air Resources Laboratory and Environmental Modeling Center (EMC) of the National Environmental Prediction (NCEP)and using the HYSPLIT dispersion model. The dispersion model is preconfigured to run over the entire country once-a-day using the 0600 UTC NAM meteorological forecast. Hourly average output maps of primary PM2.5 air concentration are produced using the actual fire locations from the previous day obtained from NOAA?s NESDIS Hazard Mapping System. The dispersion simulation consists of two parts: 1) a 24 h analysis simulation run for the previous day, and 2) a 48 h forecast simulation, which assumes that yesterday's fires will continue to burn for the next two days. The smoke particle positions at the end of each analysis period are used to initialize the next day's analysis simulation.
 
National Ceiling and Visibility (NCV) Analysis ProductThe NCV product is a frequently updated representation of current ceiling and visibility conditions derived from METAR (ASOS) stations and GOES satellite information. The products ceiling and visibility fields are derived through nearest neighbor interpolation of METAR data. This interpolation process, in effect, stretches limited-area METAR observations across the broader domain between stations while an accompanying process accounts for terrain effects on ceiling height. The resulting field helps to visualize the likely conditions at range from METARS.
 
National Convective Weather ForecastThe National Convective Weather Forecast (NCWF) is an automatically generated convective product that provides current convective hazards and 1 hour extrapolation forecasts of thunderstorm hazard locations.
 
National Digital Forecast Database (NDFD) Climate Outlook Probability ElementsThe National Digital Forecast Database (NDFD) contains a seamless mosaic of digital weather forecasts from National Weather Service (NWS) field offices and the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP). The Climate Prediction Center (CPC) is the NWS center of expertise for climate outlooks covering valid periods of one week, one month, and three-months, with lead times (i.e. advance issuance before the beginning of the valid period) from a zero lead to 12.5 months of lead time. The following Climate Outlooks by the CPC are available in the NDFD in operational status. The outlooks are probabilistic (expressed in percent). Probability of 8- to 14-Day Average Temperature Above Normal Probability of 8- to 14-Day Average Temperature Below Normal Probability of 8- to 14-Day Total Precipitation Above Median Probability of 8- to 14-Day Total Precipitation Below Median Probability of One-month Average Temperature Above Normal Probability of One-month Average Temperature Below Normal Probability of One-month Total Precipitation Above Median Probability of One-month Total Precipitation Below Median Probability of Three-month Average Temperature Above Normal Probability of Three-month Average Temperature Below Normal Probability of Three-month Total Precipitation Above Median Probability of Three-month Total Precipitation Below Median All of these elements are available for the contiguous U.S. (CONUS), the 16 pre-defined NDFD CONUS subsectors and Alaska. These probabilistic outlooks pertain to the average temperature and total precipitation for the entire valid period and not to the variability within it; these outlooks will not help people planning events for specific dates or sub-periods.
 
National Digital Forecast Database (NDFD) Convective Outlook Hazard Probability ElementsAs of April 30, 2009, the following Convective Outlook Hazard Probability elements prepared by the SPC are now available in the NDFD in operational status Categorical Convective Outlook for today (Day 1), tomorrow (Day 2), and the day following (Day 3) Probability of Tornadoes (Day 1) Probability of Hail (Day 1) Probability of Damaging Thunderstorm Winds (Day 1) Probability of Extreme Tornadoes (Day 1) Probability of Extreme Hail (Day 1) Probability of Extreme Thunderstorm Winds (Day 1) Total Probability of Severe Thunderstorms (Day 2 and Day 3) Total Probability of Extreme Severe Thunderstorms (Day 2 and Day 3) All of these elements are currently only available for the contiguous U.S. (CONUS) and the 16 pre-defined NDFD CONUS subsectors. The Convective Outlook Probabilities are issued for a convective day from 12 UTC to 12 UTC. Day 1 Outlooks are valid from 12 UTC on Day 1 (or, if issued after 12 UTC from the issuance time) to 12 UTC on Day 2. The Day 2 products are valid from 12 UTC on Day 2 to 12 UTC on Day 3. The Day 3 products are valid from 12 UTC on Day 3 to 12 UTC on Day 4. The Categorical Convective Outlook elements specify the perceived level of threat via the descriptive wording Slight, Moderate, and High Risk. However, these outlooks, do not display the forecaster’s expectations of the individual severe weather hazards (large hail,damaging winds, and tornadoes) The individual probabilistic elements further express forecaster uncertainty of the individual severe weather hazards through the use of probabilities (i.e., percent likelihood of occurrence). In the Day 1 period, forecaster expectations of large hail, damaging winds, and tornadoes are explicitly conveyed in separate forecasts. By producing forecasts of each hazard individually, users who are sensitive to one particular threat (e.g., car dealers and large hail) can make more informed decisions.
 
National Digital Forecast Database (NDFD) Day 4 to 8 Convective Outlook ElementsThe NWS provides access to operational and experimental gridded forecasts of weather elements (e.g., maximum temperature, sky cover) through the National Digital Forecast Database (NDFD). The NDFD contains a seamless mosaic of digital forecasts from NWS field offices and the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP). NCEP's Storm Prediction Center (SPC) operationally produces detailed outlooks and probability products for severe convective weather for Days 1, 2, and 3, and a more general Day 4 to 8 convective outlook (available as text and graphic products at http://www.spc.noaa.gov/products/exper/day4-8/). This element is a forecast for organized severe thunderstorms over the contiguous United States. A severe weather area depicted in the day 4 to 8 period indicates a 30% or higher probability for severe thunderstorms within 25 miles of any point
 
National Digital Forecast Database (NDFD) Graphic Forecast DisplaysThe National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) National Weather Service (NWS) National Digital Forecast Database (NDFD) Graphic Forecast Displays (http://weather.gov/forecasts/graphical/sectors/index.php) are web-based presentations of digital forecast data originating from local Weather Forecast Office (WFO) digital databases and the NDFD server. The data are displayed in a mosaic form on national and regional scales. Local scale products are not covered under this Product Description Document (PDD). For more information on the NDFD, please refer to the NDFD Information web site at the following URL: http://www.nws.noaa.gov/ndfd/index.htm.
 
National Digital Forecast Database (NDFD) Gridded DataUnder statute, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) National Weather Service (NWS) is charged to collect data on climate, water, and weather, provide forecasts and warnings of severe weather in order to protect life and property, and create and disseminate forecasts and other weather information for the benefit of a wide range of weather sensitive businesses and activities. By capitalizing on rapid advances in science and technology and infusing these advances into its operations, the NWS has taken steps to proactively respond to ever changing and growing demands of its customers and partners. The 2003 Fair Weather report, produced by the National Research Council, recommended making NWS data and products available in an Internet accessible digital form. The specific recommendation is as follows: ?Information held in digital databases should be based on widely recognized standards, formats, and metadata descriptions to ensure that data from different observing platforms, databases, and models can be integrated and used by all interested parties in the weather and climate enterprise.? The Internet is now a principal means of communicating NWS forecasts.
 
National Digital Forecast Database (NDFD) Map ViewerThe National Digital Forecast Database (NDFD) contains a seamless mosaic of digital weather forecasts from National Weather Service (NWS) field offices and the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP). The new map viewer enables users to interactively zoom and roam experimental NDFD forecast grids displayed at full resolution.
 
National Digital Forecast Database Extensible Markup LanguageNational Digital Forecast Database (NDFD) Extensible Markup Language (XML) is a service providing the public, government agencies, and commercial enterprises with user selected components for point locations of the National Weather Service?s (NWS) data embedded in XML elements. NDFD XML provides users the ability, using a machine-to-machine paradigm, to retrieve the XML-wrapped data via the Internet. This web service is provided using the SOAP protocol....
 
National Digital Forecast Database User Defined GRIB2 filesGridded forecasts requested by a user from the National Digital Forecast Database (NDFD) are encoded into GRIB2 and transmitted to that user via the World Wide Web (WWW). A user can be any member of the public, a government agency, or a commercial enterprise. The user chooses one of the weather elements that is available in the NDFD and specifies the bounding latitudes and longitudes of the grid that will be transmitted via a Web CGI interface. GRIB2 is data encoding standard described by the World Meteorological Organization in its document FM92 GRIB, Edition 2, Code Form and Tables....
 
National Drought SummaryNOAA's Climate Prediction Center and National Climatic Data center (NCDC), the U.S. Department of Agriculture, and the National Drought Mitigation Center (NDMC) jointly issues this narrative summarizing drought conditions with a look ahead.
 
National Fire Weather Web PageThe ability of the National Weather Service (NWS) to provide digital and graphic fire weather products and services over the internet continues to increase. Concurrently, the need for improved fire weather information on the internet by land management and fire suppression agencies also continues to increase. Multiple federal fire weather user agencies have expressed a need for an improved national fire weather web page that includes more interactive graphics. OS/22 Fire and Public Weather Branch began testing a new, highly interactive national fire weather web page October 1, 2009. Because existing fire weather information is bundled and/or presented in new formats, the national fire weather web page is considered a new experimental service
 
NATIONAL MULTI-SENSOR PRECIPITATION ESTIMATES WEB-BASED SERVICEThese Quantitative Precipitation Estimates (QPE) Graphics are representations of rainfall that has occurred for a specific length of time. Currently, each RFC prepares its QPE graphics using different colors, precipitation thresholds, and geographic projections. By producing these graphics centrally, it will enable the public to compare data across the CONUS and Puerto Rico. Parameter-Elevation Regressions on Independent Slopes Model (PRISM) climate data from a cooperative venture between Oregon State University and the United States Department of Agriculture-Natural Resources Conservation Service provides a grid format of normal precipitation.
 
National Snow AnalysisThe National Operational Hydrologic Remote Sensing Center (NOHRSC) is a branch in the Office of Climate, Water, and Weather Services in the National Weather Services (NWS) and is collocated with the NWS North Central River Forecast Center and the Weather Forecast Office in Chanhassen, Minnesota. The NOHRSC produces a daily National Snow Analysis (NSA) and distributes a variety of snow summaries and data sets derived from both observed and modeled hydrometeorological data. The NOHRSC NSA provides daily, comprehensive snow information for the coterminous U.S. and is accessed at: www.nohrsc.nws.gov. The NSA is based on modeled snowpack characteristics that are updated using all operationally available ground-based, airborne, and satellite observations of snow water equivalent, snow depth, and snow cover....
 
National Snowfall AnalysisThe National Weather Service (NWS) collects snowfall data from NWS Cooperative Observers (COOP) and from Community Collaborative Rain Hail and Snow Network (CoCoRaHS) observers to support its forecast and warning operations. Individual Weather Forecast Offices (WFOs) typically provide snowfall collectives in text (and occasionally in graphical) format for their areas of responsibility. This service provides unified snowfall analysis estimates for the continental US. The service includes an interactive web based map to display the snowfall analysis, as well as the ability to download the information in shape file format
 
NAVTEX ForecastThe NAVigational TEXt (NAVTEX) product is issued exclusively for the U.S. Coast Guard NAVTEX radio-teletype transmitters and receipt of those mariners equipped with NAVTEX receivers. The product contains marine forecasts and warnings.
 
NCEP Central Operations Model Analyses and Guidance Web Site This NWS/NCEP Web Site showcases National Weather Service's observtional database and graphical suite of numerical model anlysis and guidance. The site is maintained by National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Central Operations (NCO) and NOAA's Web Operations Center(WOC). In an effort to respond to user needs to protect life and property and support the nation's growing need for environmental information, a streamlined graphical approach in displaying products used by forecasters in making forecasts will serve not only NWS Offices but also the private and public sectors. This page was is periodically enhaced to accommodate requests from customers.
 
NDFD CLIMATENDFD Climate is a computer application that creates images of forecast and climatological parameters for the continental U.S. from two different digital data sets. The first data set is the NDFD (National Digital Forecast Database) weather forecast grids produced by the NOAA National Weather Service (NWS) and the second data set is PRISM (Parameter-elevation Regressions on Independent Slopes Model), an expert system that uses point climatological temperature data and a digital elevation model (DEM) to generate gridded estimates of climate parameters. The NOAA National Weather Service (NWS) National Digital Forecast Database (NDFD) contains digital forecast grids of sensible weather elements such as temperature, wind, and precipitation in a mosaic from collaborating field offices across the U.S. for forecasts out to seven days. Daily digital climatology grids of maximum and minimum temperature are created using Parameter-elevation Regressions on Independent Slopes Model (PRISM; Daly et al. 1994) method. NDFDClimate grids produced include: PRISM derived normal daily maximum and minimum temperatures, NDFD derived forecasted heating and cooling degree days through day 6, NDFD forecasted daily minimum and maximum temperature anomalies derived from PRISM daily climate fields through day six, NDFD derived five day total of forecast heating and cooling degree days, NDFD 60 hour total of liquid equivalent QPF, NDFD forecasted number of hours the temperature is above or below a defined temperature through day three, NDFD forecasted 24- and 48-hour forecast temperature changes from forecast issue time.
 
NDFD Full Resolution The resolution has been increased in the National Digital Forecast Database. The NDFD spatial resolution will be available in experimental status at 2.5km resolution for all forecast times. The NDFD temporal resolution will be available in experimental status at one hour resolution for the first 36 hours from NDFD issuance time. These are the finest spatial and temporal resolutions at which Weather Forecast Offices in the Conterminous United States /CONUS/ provide forecasts. Forecasts from NWS offices and centers employing coarser resolutions will be mapped onto the finer resolution NDFD grid This change will affect files which contain data for the entire CONUS, but will not include Alaska, Hawaii, Guam, Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands, or the 16 CONUS subsectors which will remain at their current operational resolutions
 
NDFD Quantitative Precipitation Forecast (QPF) for HawaiiOn July 8, 2008 the Quantitative Precipitation Forecast (QPF) for Hawaii to the National Digital Forecast Database (NDFD) was transitioned to operationa Status. On November 1, 2006, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) National Weather Service (NWS) introduced Quantitative Precipitation Forecast (QPF) for Hawaii to the National Digital Forecast Database (NDFD) as an experimental element. QPF is already available in NDFD on an experimental basis for the conterminous U.S. (CONUS), the 16 pre-defined NDFD CONUS subsectors, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands.
 
Nearshore Forecast (NSH)The NSH describes forecast conditions including any event-driven marine hazards occurring or expected to occur over the Great Lakes nearshore waters for a 48 hour forecast period.
 
NephanalysisA graphical product routinely prepared for the Central and Eastern Pacific Ocean Basin that provides a depiction of significant cloud features, a description of the cloud types, and their areal coverage.
 
New Forecast at a Glance Point and Click IconsThe new icons are intended to enhance communication of rapidly changing weather conditions, while also highlighting current weather hazards.
 
NHC Audio Briefings (Podcasts) The National Hurricane Center (NHC) provides audio briefings (also called podcasts) when the media pool is activated by the NHC Public Affairs Officer. The audio feeds are created in mp3 format. The service is intended to provide users with additional information to enhance their ability to make planning and preparedness decisions. Currently, NHC media briefings are only broadcast on television or select radio stations, at the stations’ discretion. MP3 format allows the general public to access these briefings. The podcasts will also increase the distribution of NHC media briefings to additional outlets, to include newspapers and radio stations.
 
NHC/TAFB Satellite Rainfall QPE and QPF Webpage This product provides event-driven satellite-based quantitative precipitation estimates (QPE) and model-derived quantitative precipitation forecasts (QPF) for tropical cyclones and tropical disturbances affecting areas within the National Hurricane Center and Central Pacific Hurricane Center areas of responsibility (AOR). The product represents an improvement over the existing text-only satellite precipitation estimate product which is based on the Griffith-Woodley technique developed in the 1970s. The experimental product provides more robust satellite-based precipitation estimates from the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) Blended and the Climate Prediction Center (CPC) QMORPH techniques and a time-matched forecast from the Global Forecast System (GFS) in tabular text and storm centered graphical formats. An experimental graphical version of these precipitation estimates is also provided as well as an experimental graphical 24 hour QPF from the Princeton Geophysical Fluid Dynamics (GFDL), the NOAA Hurricane Weather Research and Forecast (HWRF), and the GFS models. The target audience for this product primarily includes the forecast centers in the Caribbean, Mexico, Central America, and the Eastern and Central North Pacific. . In addition, decision support service (DSS) entities would have access to targeted QPF guidance that may be of assistance for distributing and directing resources to areas impacted by heavy rainfall
 
NHC/TAFB Web Based Graphicast Daily graphical/alphanumeric depiction of significant weather features expected to affect the Tropical North Atlantic, Tropical Northeast Pacific and Southeast Pacific offshore waters and high seas area of responsibility of the Tropical Analysis and Forecast Branch.
 
NOAA NWS RFC Soil Moisture Model OutputThe North Central River Forecast Center (NCRFC) has been exploring usability of National Weather Service (NWS) river forecast model soil moisture model output for applications beyond river flood forecasting. This valuable output could be used to support various activities related to economic cost savings for industry sectors involved in land resource management.
 
NOAA Weather Radio PodcastsThe NWS is responsible for making its weather, water and climate information widely available to taxpayers using commonly accepted standards and technologies. Currently, the NWS provides only limited audio broadcasts of their NOAA Weather Radio All Hazards (NWR) via the Internet. The Voice Improvement Program (VIP) software on the NWR is able to convert the text transmitted to the Console Replacement System (CRS) into MPEG audio Layer-3 (MP3) files. Southern Region NWS offices are making these MP3 files available on the Internet as podcasts. Podcasting allows for publishing of audio programs to the internet and subsequent downloading of these programs to a personal computer or MP3 device. Users subscribe to the NWR podcast by using a freely available podcasting application that downloads the MP3 file automatically using an RSS (Really Simple Syndication) feed. Podcasting applications typically check for new content (new MP3 files) at user defined intervals. Once downloaded, the user can then listen to the podcast at his/her leisure (versus a radio broadcast of NWR).
 
Non Technical Format of the Winter Low Tracks GraphicThe National Weather Service (NWS) National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Hydrometeorological Prediction Center (HPC) Winter Weather Desk (WWD) issues a forecast of significant surface low positions twice daily. This graphic is known as the Winter Low Tracks Graphic. The Winter Low Tracks Graphic depicts over the contiguous U.S. (CONUS) the HPC forecast position of significant surface lows in 12 hour increments out to 72 hours. Uncertainty in the HPC forecast low position is depicted by including the forecast low position from model guidance available to the HPC forecaster
 
NWS Current Observations Using RSS and XML Based FormatsProvide current observations in two Internet based formats. Each format provides a channel for users to quickly access specific products. Products are organized by ASOS station ID. Two data exchange formats using Extensible Markup Language (XML) are provided for customers and partners who wish either display selected parts of the products or provide a display of the products to other customers. The product homepage can be accessed at: http://weather.gov/data/current_obs/
 
NWS Pendleton Decision Support Web PageThe Decision Support Web Page provides the following information to Internet users: 1) Graphical weather hazards for the next seven days using a Google Map interface; 2) Graphical ventilation forecast for the next 3 days; 3) Daily dispersion outlook text forecast; 4) Links to the SPC Fire Weather Forecast; 5) Links to aviation tactical decision aids; 6) Links to the SPC Day1 and Day2 Convective Outlooks; 7) Uncertainty forecasts for temperature using plume diagrams for 12 MOS points in the Pendleton County Warning Area; 8) Links to GOES satellite and NEXRAD radar data; 9) Current observations displayed using Google Maps; 10) Text Hazardous Weather Outlook, Area Forecast Discussion, Local Storm Report, and Short Term Forecast products;
 
NWS Use of Twitter as an Environmental Information ServiceNWS will be using Twitter as a supplemental channel to experimentally disseminate environmental information and promote weather awareness activities including outreach and educational efforts.
 
NWS Warnings Using Geographic Information SystemsNWS-issued short-fused warnings are added to a real-time database and Geographic Information System (GIS) shapefiles are generated from this database. In addition, an updated graphic is displayed that displays the current status of warnings.
 
NWS Watches, Warnings, and Advisories using ATOM and CAP XML based FormatsInternet based feeds of NWS watch/warning/advisory products using the SML-based Common Alerting Protocol (CAP) v1.1 and ATOM message formats. CAP is an information standard used to facilitate emergency information sharing and data exchange across local, state, tribal, national and non-governmental organizations of different professions that provide emergency response and management services. The ATOM feed provides an index of active NWS CAP messages in a geographic area. The CAP and ATOM feeds allow NWS Partners, emergency managers and others to access, re-use and re-distribute this mission critical information to a greater extent than ever before possible. For example, CAP messages may be readily integrated with consumer electronics decision support systems and mobile alerts.
 
NWS web services via wireless technologiesNWS is responsible to make its weather, water and climate information widely available to taxpayers using commonly accepted standards and technologies.One of the most widely accepted, available and cost effective means of accomplishing this objective is the use of web services via the internet, and NWS has implemented a corporate-wide HTTP-based web service. This service has allowed users instant access to current NWS information via industry standard web browsers and internet connections. A rapidly evolving technology in the United States today is the ability to access internet content via wireless devices such as Personal Digital Assistants (PDA) and cell phones.
 
Observed Precipitation MapThe National Weather Service (NWS) collects rainfall data to support its forecast and warning operations. Individual River Forecast Centers (RFCs)and Weather Forecast Offices typically provide rainfall collectives in text format and graphical format for their areas of responsibility. The National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Climate Prediction Center (CPC), collects additional data from cooperative observers. This rainfall data is made available to HPC and is used extensively for verification purposes.This rainfall data is plotted on a map of the CONUS and made available to forecasters. The data is used for feedback on forecast accuracy and can be used in case studies and other scientific endeavors.
 
Offshore Waters ForecastAn alphanumeric product routinely prepared for the Offshore Marine Zones in the Atlantic and Pacific Ocean Basins that provides forecasts of wind, waves, visibility, icing, and significant weather out to the five day forecast period.
 
One-Month Climate Outlook (Contiguous U.S. and Alaska).The Climate Prediction Center (CPC) issues a probabilistic one-month temperature and precipitation outlook. (Revised - Version 3)
 
One-Month Outlook Discussion (Contiguous U.S. and Alaska).A technical discussion of the meteorological and climatological basis for the one-month outlooks. (Revised - Version 3)
 
Open Lakes ForecastAn alphanumeric product prepared by NWS Offices with Marine responsibility over the Great Lakes. This is a routinely issued product that describes forecast conditions and event-driven marine hazards expected over the five day forecast period. A coded fo
 
Operational Day 5 Tropical Cyclone ForecastThe approval of this PDD authorizes the public dissemination of an operational Day 5 tropical cyclone forecast. Two products will require modification if Day 5 forecasts are approved:
 
Palmer Drought Severity Index.The Climate Prediction Center?s (CPC) and U.S. Department of Agriculture?s Joint Agricultural Weather Facility (JAWF) produces the Palmer Drought Severity Index chart. The index indicates long term conditions.
 
PHX Drought Data PageThe PHX Drought Data Page was developed in response to a request from the Arizona Governors Drought Task Force. The product provides a single web based interface for users to more easily access precipitation data from the state for purposes of "decision making" as related to the ongoing drought in Arizona.
 
Post Tropical Cyclone Report (PSH)The PSH is an alphanumeric product summarizing the meteorological parameters observed within a Weather Forecast Offices County Warning Area after a tropical cyclone event.
 
Potential Storm Surge Flooding MapThe Potential Storm Surge Flooding Map is a product that provides valuable information on potential storm surge flooding for areas along the U.S. Gulf and East Coast at risk from storm surge during a tropical cyclone event
 
Precipitation Frequency Data ServerNWS precipitation frequency estimates have traditionally been delivered in the form of Weather Bureau Technical Papers and Memoranda as well as NOAA Atlases, all hard copy documents. With the advent of the World Wide Web, these documents have been scanned and made available via web pages. The National Weather Service specifically developed the Precipitation Frequency Data Server as the primary web portal to precipitation frequency estimates and associated information (Parzybok and Yekta, 2003). Recent updates to NWS precipitation frequency are being delivered entirely in digital rather than hard copy form in order to make the estimates more widely available to the public and to provide the data in a broader and more accessible range of formats.
 
Precipitation Potential IndexThe Precipitation Potential Index will display graphically on the internet. The graphic is a means to show forecaster confidence as to the location of precipitation at each hour across the CWA. It is intended to supplement the 12 hour POP and weather grids.
 
Probabilistic Hurricane Inundation Surge HeightThe Probabilistic Tropical Cyclone Inundation Guidance products has been renamed the Probabilistic Hurricane Inundation Surge Height product. a.The Probabilistic Hurricane Inundation Surge Height (PHISH)guidance products consist of two suites of probabilities for the Gulf of Mexico and Atlantic coastal areas: 1) Probabilities, in percent, of inundation exceeding 0 through 20 feet above ground level, at 1 foot intervals (e.g., the probabilities in percent, of inundation exceeding 0 feet, 1 foot, 2 feet, .. 20 feet). 2) Probabilities of inundation heights (above ground level) being exceeded. The suite of products range from 10 to 50 percent, at 10 percent intervals. Each of the probabilities mentioned above will be provided out to 78 hours as a cumulative probability, defined as the overall probability the event will occur at each grid cell from the start of the run until some specified time (e.g. 0-6 hours, 0-12, 0-18, etc.)and as an incremental probability, defined as the probability the event will occur sometime during the specified forecast period (e.g. 0 - 6 hours, 6-12, 12-18, etc.) at each grid cell. The products are based upon an ensemble of Sea, Lake, and Overland Surge from Hurricanes (SLOSH) model runs using the National Hurricane Center (NHC) official advisory and accounts for track, size, and intensity errors based on historical errors. Plans are underway for tide to be incorporated into the suite of products during the 2013 hurricane season. Long term plans are to incorporate waves and freshwater (i.e. precipitation runoff and river inflow).
 
Probabilistic Quantitative Precipitation ForecastsNOAA's Strategic Plan states that we are to "Improve the reliability, lead-time, and effectiveness of weather and water information and services that predict changes in environmental conditions." To support that effort, The National Weather Service Strategic Plan for 2005 to 2010: Working Together to Save Lives, establishes a mission goal to develop new capabilities and move into a new direction of forecasts... and expand beyond traditional weather and water products. In response to the NOAA and NWS goals, the Weather Forecast Office in Tulsa, Oklahoma (TSA) has developed a method to provide probabilistic quantitative precipitation forecasts on a routine basis, in the form of probability of exceedance (POE) forecasts. This method will be used at several Weather Service Forecast Offices (WFOs) in the Southern Region. These POEs will provide our clients and customers with more detailed precipitation forecasts that they can use in their decision-making processes.
 
Probabilistic Tropical Cyclone Storm Surge and Tide Above DatumThe Probabilistic Tropical Cyclone Storm Surge and Tide Above Datum consists of two suites of graphics. Probability of storm surge and tide above datum - series of graphics which show probabilities, in percent, of storm surge with tide exceeding 2 through 25 feet above North American Vertical Datum of 1988(NAVD88), at 1 foot intervals. Exceedance height of storm surge and tide above datum- series of graphics which show heights of storm surge with tide, in feet above NAVD88, which will be exceeded by a given percentage of storms. The suite of graphics range from 10 to 50 percent, at 10 percent intervals.
 
Probabilistic Tropical Cyclone Storm Surge Exceedance productsThe Tropical Cyclone Storm Surge Exceedance products provide storm susrge heights (in feet above normal tide level) and the probabilities from 10 to 90% increments, of storm surge exceeding the displayed height. The products are produced when a hurricane watch and/or warning is in effect for any portion of the Gulf or Atlantic coasts of the continental US. The products are available in graphic form, GRIB2 and ESRI Shape files.
 
Probabilistic Winter Precipitation Forecasts (PWPF) Percentiles of Snow and Ice AccumulationsThe Probabilistic Winter Precipitation Forecasts (PWPF) are based on the deterministic Weather Prediction Center (WPC) Winter Weather Desk (WWD) accumulation forecasts, but are generated automatically using an ensemble of model forecasts along with the WWD forecasts. The automatic nature of this product generation allows a much more extensive set of displays of probabilities for snowfall and freezing rain accumulation exceeding several thresholds (probability of exceedance) as well as displays for several percentile levels. These probabilistic winter precipitation forecasts are provided as guidance forecasts for use by the RFCs and WFOs. They are also available to the emergency management community, media, and general public.The target audience includes NWS forecasters, the academic community, the emergency management community, and anyone interested in winter weather forecasts.
 
Probability of Exceedence Outlook for Center Probability Distribution (50 percent)The Climate Prediction Center (CPC) issues a series of thirteen three-month graphical outlooks for the 50 percent probability of exceedence (or center probability distribution) for temperature and precipitation across the contiguous U.S.
 
Probability of Freezing TemperaturesThe Probability of Freezing Temperatures product will be a graphical display on the internet of the probability (in percent) that overnight low temperatures will fall to freezing or below across the (PDT) County Warning Area (CWA) for the ?tonight? and ?tomorrow night? time periods. It will be updated as necessary, but at a minimum with each major Zone Forecast issuance at 3 pm and 4 am local Pacific time. The product will be issued seasonally in the fall from September 15th until November 30th and in the Spring from March 15th until May 31st.
 
Probability of Meeting or Exceeding Specific Temperature ThresholdsThe Probability of Meeting or Exceeding Specific Temperature Thresholds (e.g. Freezing or 100 degrees) is a graphical display on the Internet of the probability (in percent) that temperatures will either rise above or fall below the desired threshold in a given county Warning Area (CWA) for the Day 1 and Day 2 forecast time periods. It will be updated as necessary, but will be issued at a minimum with each major Zone Forecast package at 3 pm and 4 am local Pacific time.
 
Real Time US Total Electron Content Vertical and SlantThe US Total Electron Content (US-TEC) product is designed to specify TEC over the Continental US (CONUS) in near real time. The product uses a Kalman Filter data assimilation technique driven by data from ground-based Global Positioning System (GPS) dual frequency receivers. The primary data stream comes from the Maritime and Nationwide Differential GPS (M/NDGPS) real time network of stations operated by the US Coast Guard (USCG). As of Oct 2004 there were about 60 M/NDGPS stations ingested into the model. This number has been gradually increasing and will be augmented by Federal Aviation Administration/Wide Area Augmentation System (FAA/WAAS) data, and stations operated by the Forecast System Laboratory (FSL). This product has evolved from collaboration among Space Environment Center (SEC), National Geodetic Survey (NGS), National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC), and FSL.
 
Real-Time Mesoscale Analysis (RTMA)The National Weather Service (NWS) weather forecast offices (WFOs) produce and send digital forecasts to various users. These forecasts of hydrometeorological variables, such as temperature and precipitation, contribute to the generation of the NWS National Digital Forecast Database (NDFD). The Real-Time Mesoscale Analysis (RTMA) is a gridded analysis of the hydrometeorological variables that matches the NDFD spatial resolution. Products from this analysis are generated hourly, disseminated to NWS field offices and National Centers, and available for external users. The RTMA is the first component of the NWS Analysis of Record (AOR) project. RTMA product generation for the CONUS region includes the following products: surface temperature, surface dew point, wind speed and direction, and cloud and precipitation amount products, and u and v wind components. The product set generated for RTMA Alaska, Hawaii, Guam and Puerto Rico contain the same parameters as CONUS regions except for the cloud amount and precipitation products. Analyses for the Guam domain are available at three hour intervals. An analysis uncertainty product is generated for all RTMA products except the cloud and precipitation products, and u and v wind components.
 
Real-Time Mesoscale Analysis – Surface Pressure, Surface Pressure Uncertainty, and Model Terrain Height THE OPERATIONAL REAL-TIME MESOSCALE ANALYSIS SURFACE PRESSURE ANALYSIS, SURFACE PRESSURE UNCERTAINTY ANALYSIS AND MODEL TERRAIN HEIGHT ANALYSIS ARE NOW COVERED UNDER THE OPERATIONAL REAL-TIME MESOSCALE ANALYSIS PDD. SEE RTMA catalog entry for complete details.
 
Red Flag Potential IndexThe Red Flag Potential Index (RFPI) is a graphical product produced by forecasters at WFO Las Vegas (VEF) using GFE/IFPS. Ratings of Red Flag potential (numbers 1 through 4) for the next three days (today, tomorrow and the next day) are calculated using forecasts of relative humidity and prevailing 20-ft, 10-minute average surface wind, along with forecaster knowledge of other factors such as critical fire conditions and the existence of active wildfires. The RFPI is intended to be used as general guidance, primarily for planning purposes. Since the southern half of our forecast area operates an aggressive, proactive prescribed burn program, this product will be issued year-round.
 
Redesign NWS Web Services Via Wireless TechnologiesThis product is a redesign of its existing mobile web page, http://mobile.weather.gov. The goal of the redesign is to update the look, feel, and functionality of NWS mobile web presence in order to better take advantage of the capabilities.
 
Regional Flash Flood Guidance GraphicsFlash Flood Guidance (FFG) is the amount of rainfall in a given time period that will produce flooding on small streams. FFG is distributed via AWIPS in text products and lists FFG values for 1-, 3-, 6-, 12-, and 24-hour time periods for each county. The experimental Regional FFG Graphics are Internet web pages that show these FFG values in both graphical and tabular form. These graphic products are for the entire Southern Region (SR) area, the area of responsibility of each SR River Forecast Center (RFC), and each state in SR. In addition to having a state graphic for Texas, graphics of FFG for north, south, and west Texas are available.
 
Regional/Local Seasonal ForecastRegional/Local Seasonal Forecasts may be textual or graphical. They typically consist of short-term climate variability forecasts and monitoring data, and meteorological/hydrological interpretation and assessment of societal impact on a web page. These web pages will normally provide educational material to help users understand the forecast methodology and reliability to better aid preparedness and mitigation efforts. The web page will typically assimilate a wide variety of information on short-term climate variability for the forecast area such as links to official NOAA/NWS forecasts and experimental, locally/regionally produced graphical/textual monitoring products. The area covered by the forecast may be a commonly accepted political or geographical location such as a state, county or region, or it may be a uniquely defined in which case the area will be made explicitly clear on a map on the web page. An example of such a seasonal forecast product suite is the "Florida EL Nino - Southern Oscillation (ENSO) Home Page Featuring: 2002-2003 Experimental Dry Season Forecast for Florida (Valid for period November 1st 2002 through April 30th 2003)" produced by WFO Melbourne, Florida and available on the Internet at: http://www.srh.noaa.gov/mlb/enso/mlbnino.html
 
RIDGE Radar Integrated Display with Geospatial Elements (National)NWS is responsible to make its weather, water and climate information widely available to taxpayers using commonly accepted standards and technologies. Currently, the NWS provides weather radar information for all Weather Service Doppler Radars (WSR 88-D) in the United States on the NWS Internet page. The National Weather Service Southern Region, working in cooperation with North Central Texas Council of Governments, has developed a method to display radar images more efficiently than the previous method. These radar images, call RIDGE (Radar Integrated Display with Geospatial Elements), allows the radar image to be combined with geospatial elements such as topography maps, highways, and county boundaries. This not only produces a better image, but provides additional reference information for users to understand where they are located. RIDGE also adds the ability to overlay polygon warnings issued by the National Weather Service Forecast Offices.
 
Rip Current Probability GraphicalThe National Weather Services (NWS) Rip Current Probability Graphical product provides a graphical representation of the probabilities of rip currents along area beaches from Pender County, NC south to Georgetown County, SC. This product is issued twice a day.
 
Route ForecastThe Route Forecast (ROFOR) is an alphanumeric product providing a coded route forecast for regularly scheduled flights or upon request for flights that either begin or end in or that have most of the flight path within the National Weather Service's Pac
 
Sacramento WRF NMM Model OutputThe Sacramento WRF_NMM is run locally at the WFO Sacramento and gives hourly output out to 48 hours. The high resolution model is used for operational forecasting and research in Northern California. Model Output graphics, generated by GEMPAK software, are posted for 3 hourly forecast time steps to the WFO Sacramento web page. The fields include geopotential heights, vorticity, temperatures, dew point, relative humidity, wind, vertical velocity, freezing level, precipitation amount and type, sea level pressure, thickness, clouds, precipitable water, convective available potential energy (CAPE), and convective inhibition (CIN). The model would replace existing Workstation Eta output on the website.
 
Satellite Interpretation MessageSIM is an alphanumeric product providing an interpretation of synoptic weather features, significant weather areas, and various cloud and weather phenomena based upon satellite imagery (visual, infrared, water vapor, etc.). National Weather Service's Pacific Region's Weather Forecast Office (WFO) Honolulu prepares the SIM for a portion of their area of responsibility (AOR). The AORs for WFOs Honolulu vary and depend upon the program (tropical cyclone, aviation, marine, public, and satellite).
 
Sea Ice AdvisoryProvides analysis, forecast, and climatological information pertaining to sea ice in the waters surrounding Alaska.
 
Sea Ice AnalysisSea ice conditions for the waters surrounding Alaska
 
Sea State AnalysisA graphical product depicting sea state conditions over the North Atlantic and Pacific Ocean Basins. Features such as the location of the ice edge and the isopleths for wave heights and arrows for swell direction are depicted.
 
Sierra Backcountry ForecastThe Sierra Backcountry Forecast is a web based text product produced by forecasters in support of the Sierra Avalanche Center and the Central Sierra Avalanche Center. The product provides forecasted parameters critical to accurately forecasting avalanche conditions by the Sierra Avalanche Centers. The elements forecasted include temperatures, winds, and sky/weather, all of which affect the stability of the snowpack, changes in the snowpack structure, and ultimately avalanche potential.
 
Significant Meteorological Information (SIGMET)SIGMETs are concise, brief descriptions of the development and occurrence or expected occurrence in time and space of specified en-route weather phenomena which may affect the safety of all aircraft operations.
 
Southern Region TRACON APPROACH and DEPARTURE GATE FORECAST PRODUCTThe Southern Region Tracon Approach and Departure Gate Forecast will complement the Collaborative Convection Forecast Product (CCFP) by providing greater detail of convective occurrence and coverage of significant reflectivities and echo tops as determined collaboratively between the CWSU MIC, the Air Route Traffic Control Center’s (ARTCC) Traffic Management Unit (TMU) and the impacted Terminal Radar Approach Control (TRACON). Variations in the presentation and depiction are authorized based on the needs and requirements of the specific ARTCC TMU and TRACON
 
Space Weather for Aviation Service ProvidersThe Space Environment Center (SEC) Space Weather for Aviation Service Providers web page combines graph and text presentations of near real-time solar and geophysical parameters of interest to the aviation industry. This page incorporates products and models which are driven by data and imagery from ground-based and space-based observations. The Space Weather for Aviation Service Providers web page displays retrieved and reformatted existing SEC products.
 
Space Weather Forecast DiscussionPlain language Space Weather Forecast Discussion bulletin detailing recently observed space weather data, model guidance, and plain text forecaster rationale to compliment to the new 3-Day Space Weather Forecast product, tailored to sophisticated users and scientific perspectives
 
Space Weather Prediction WebsiteThis completely redesigned site leverages the latest web technologies to reach the broadest possible audience.
 
Spanish Tsunami MesssagesThe NWS/AR West Coast and Alaska Tsunami Warning Center (WCATWC) provides tsunami warning, advisory, watch, and information messages to its AOR which consists of Canada, Puerto Rico, Virgin Islands, and the ocean coasts of all states except Hawaii. Presently, the products are all issued in English. Three new products that mimic WCATWC tsunami products for the Atlantic (Puerto Rico, USVI, east coast, and Gulf of Mexico coast) that are composed in Spanish. The TSUATE product is the bulleted tsunami warning, advisory, and watch product. TIBATE is the bulleted tsunami information statement for earthquakes over magnitude 6. EQIAT1 is the bulleted tsunami information statement for earthquakes below magnitude 6.
 
SPC Day 1-3 Categorical Convective Outlooks The Storm Prediction Center Day 1-3 Categorical Outlook include a defined areas of general non-severe thunderstorms, and 5 risk categories of severe convection (1 - Marginal, 2- Slight, 3-Enhanced, 4-Moderate, and 5-High). These outlooks previously included a defined area of general thunderstorms, and only three defined risk categories of severe convective weather (SLIGHT, MODERATE, and HIGH). The addition of “Marginal” and “Enhanced” categories will more closely compare to the SPC Day 1-3 Narrative and Probabilistic Convective Outlooks, and WFO products.
 
SPC Day 4-8 Severe Weather Outlooks The Storm Prediction Center (SPC) Day 4-8 Severe Weather Outlooks are five separate graphics, one for each day (D4, D5, D6, D7, and D8), that depict areas of organized convection in the contiguous U.S. (CONUS). Two thresholds (15% probability and 30% probability) are used to depict these areas.The outlooks help users to adequately prepare several days in advance of an expected severe weather episode.The target audience includes NWS CONUS Weather Forecast Offices (WFOs), the public, media and emergency managers. products will provide five separate outlook graphics, one for each day (D4, D5, D6, D7, and D8).
 
SPC Dry Thunderstorm Fire Weather Outlook for Days 4 through 8 This product provides a daily categorical forecast of critical fire weather conditions for dry thunderstorms in the 4 through 8 day period.The National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Storm Prediction Center (SPC) provides Day 1, Day 2 and Day 3-8 Fire Weather Outlooks (narrative and graphical) describing large-scale meteorological conditions in the lower 48 states which, when combined with the antecedent fuel conditions, favor the rapid growth and spread of a wildfire, should a fire ignition occur. These outlooks provide guidance for WFO forecasters and aid land management agencies in determining large-scale areas of fire danger risk.
 
SPC Enhanced Resolution Thunderstorm OutlookThe Storm Prediction Center (SPC) is the National Weather Service’s (NWS)center of expertise for forecasting convection, including economically-disruptive weather events such as tornadoes, large hail, damaging winds and heavy rainfall. Included within the SPC Severe Weather (Convective) Outlook (SWO) for the CONUS is a forecast for a 10% or greater probability of thunderstorms. Since these thunderstorm forecasts cover a 24 hour period with only the 10% probability contour, they provide little in the way of temporal or spatial resolution. The SPC Thunderstorm Outlook adds greater temporal and spatial resolution by depicting the expected areal coverage and probabilities for thunderstorms in 4 or 8 hour time periods. A 40% probability means that given similar environmental conditions, a thunderstorm would be observed at any one location (in either a county or city) within the 40% thunderstorm probability area four times out of ten, or 40% of the time. The greater temporal and spatial resolution of the SPC Thunderstorm Outlook will aid both NWS forecasters and NWS Partners in time-sensitive decisions related to thunderstorms, and ultimately provide greater safety for the United States public.
 
Special Marine WarningAn alphanumeric product issued from all WFOs with Marine responsibility. The product is issued to provide notification of short duration marine hazards such as waterspouts, thunderstorms, or hail.
 
SR CWSU Web-based TRACON Briefings The National Weather Service-Southern Region Center Weather Service Units (CWSU) may develop web-based briefings for Terminal Radar Approach CONtrol (TRACON) that aviation customers can use for tactical and strategic planning for operations. Maps and other graphics used in the web-based TRACON briefings are culled from various maps, models and charts available on the web. Variations in the presentation and depiction are authorized based on the needs and requirements of the specific ARTCC TMU and TRACON.
 
Standardized WFO, Regional, and National Climate Web PagesOnce implemented, this standardization of climate information (regarding what type is provided and where it?s located on NWS Web pages) will enable our users to consistently find climate data no matter which NWS level (WFO, regional, or national) they access via the Web.
 
Storm Based (Polygon) Special Weather Statements ERThreat based polygon warnings, or storm based warnings were implemented nationally in 2008 and essential to effectively warn for severe weather and flash floods. SB warnings show the specific meteorological threat area and are not restricted to geopolitical boundaries. By focusing on the true threat area, polygons help improve NWS warning accuracy and quality. ER initiated an experimental Polygon Storm Based Special Weather Statements (SBS) at Weather Forecast Offices (WFO) Blacksburg, VA and State College, PA in 2009 to promote increased accuracy of alerting the public to significant weather events. The SBS methodology allows the forecaster the opportunity to be spatially specific, eliminating large areas needlessly alerted when compared to issuing a county based SBS. Based on positive feedback from partners and users, the SBS has been transitioned to an official product for all ER WFOs. The Guidelines for SBS issuance are included in ER supplement 05-2010 Special Weather Statements.
 
Storm Prediction Center Day 3-8 Fire Weather Outlook GuidanceThis Product Description Document concerns SPC issuance of Day 3-8 fire weather outlooks to provide national guidance on a critical public safety issue for media, emergency managers, local National Weather Service Forecast Offices and ultimately the United States public. This product will help its customers to adequately prepare several days in advance for the potential of significant fire weather conditions. This product enhancement is aligned with the NOAA Strategic Objective for FY2005-2010 to ?Improve predictability of the onset, duration and impact of hazardous severe weather and water events? and its experimental initiation was part of the 2005 NWS Service Improvement Plan.
 
Surf Zone ForecastAn alphanumeric product issued from selected WFOs with coastal waters marine responsibility.  The product provides information on surf, water, any potential marine hazards such as rip currents, and the general weather conditions within the surf zone.
 
Surface AnalysisA graphical product depicting of significant surface features over the Atlantic and Pacific Ocean Basins north of 15 degrees north. Features such as the location of high and low pressure systems, frontal positions, and the analyzed locations of any existing Tropical Cyclones are included.
 
Surface Temperature Analysis and AnomalyThe Sea Surface Temperature Analysis (SST) and Sea Surface Temperature Anomalies (SSTA)are graphical products depicting sea surface water temperatures and departure from normal. WFO Honolulu produces the SST for the North Pacific (area bounded by equator to 55N and 110W to 160E) and the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Environmental Modeling Center (EMC) produces the SST for both the Atlantic and Eastern Pacific(area bounded by 10S to 50N and 0 to 180 longitude) and the SSTA product for the Atlantic and Eastern Pacific (area bounded by 10S to 50N and 0 W to 180 W longitude).
 
Tabular Product Evolution in eXtensible Markup Language - Derived Selected Cities Summary ProductsTPEX-derived Selected Cities Summary (SCS) products are created from three eXtensible Markup Language (XML) products: ObX - hourly observations FOX3 - highly summarized 3 day forecasts TEX - observed National high/low temperatures The TPEX-derived SCS products are created using an eXtensible Stylesheet Language Transformation (XSLT) style sheet and mimic the legacy SCS products
 
Tabular Product Evolution in eXtensible Markup Language Products Four eXtensible Markup Language (XML) products have been created using the forecast information contained in the National Digital Forecast Database (NDFD) for those cities currently contained in the Selected Cities Summary (SCS): ObX - hourly observations FOX3 - highly summarized 3 day forecasts FOX7 -highly summarized 7 day forecasts TEX - observed National high/low temperatures These products can be used as is, or user defined format products (text, HTML, etc.) can be created using eXtensible Stylesheet Language Transformation (XSLT) style sheets. We hope our users and partners will migrate away from legacy text products (e.g., SCS, etc.) to the new XML products.
 
Tactical Convective Hazard Product (TCHP)The TCHP provides a graphical presentation of thunderstorm hazards to aviation operations. It depicts current hazardous thunderstorms and a one-hour forecast of hazardous thunderstorm locations. The TCHP updates automatically every 5 minutes. The product is created from radar and lightning data as well as human-generated Convective SIGMET in-flight advisories (SIGMETs updated hourly).
 
Tactical Decision AidThe Tactical Decision Aid (TDA) web page for the Terminal Radar Approach Controller (TRACON) highlights forecasts of thunderstorm potential for the TRACON's aircraft arrival corner posts. These forecasts will be updated hourly during periods of convective weather (occurring or forecast) and every four hours during periods of no convective weather. Forecasts will cover a 4 hour time frame. Forecast output will be a color-coded, bar graph indicating the hourly probability of thunderstorm activity at each corner post during the upcoming 4 hour period.
 
TAFB Marine Weather Discussion (MIM)Plain language free text discussion of computer model trends which focuses on expected wind and sea conditions. The product is used as a coordination vehicle among the national centers and coastal Weather Forecast Offices.
 
Take Off Forecast ProductThe Take Off Forecast is a text product produced by an automated program that is then edited and/or augmented by Forecasters or Hydro-Meteorological Technicians (HMTs). The automated program uses FRH model data output for pressure, the Terminal Aerodrome Forecast (TAF) for winds, and the Aviation Model Output Statistics (MAV) for temps and comes up in an editable display with the last 6 hours of obs displayed. The forecast includes an hour by hour prediction of the winds, temps, altimeter setting, and, sometimes, a forecast of wet or dry runway conditions expected on the airport within a 6 hour period from the time of issuance. Forecasts are updated every 6 hours.
 
Terminal Aerodrome Forecast (TAF)The TAF is an operational forecast consisting of the expected meteorological conditions significant to a given airport or terminal. TAFs always include a forecast of surface wind speed and direction, visibility, and clouds.
 
Three-Month Climate Outlooks (Contiguous U.S. and Alaska).The Climate Prediction Center (CPC) issues a series of thirteen probabilistic three-month temperature and precipitation outlooks.
 
Three-Month Outlooks Discussion (Contiguous U.S. and Alaska).The Climate Prediction Center (CPC) provides a technical discussion of the meteorological and climatological basis for the outlooks.
 
Three-month Probability of Exceedence OutlooksThe Climate Prediction Center (CPC) issues a series of thirteen three-month probability of exceedence outlooks for temperature, precipitation, and heating and cooling degree days for the conterminous U.S.
 
Tropical Cyclone Advisory MessageThe Tropical Cyclone Advisory message (TCA) is an abbreviated alphanumeric text product which the National Hurricane Center (NHC) and the Central Pacific Hurricane Center (CPHC) issue.
 
Tropical Cyclone Cumulative Wind Distribution (CWD) GraphicThe CWD graphic is issued by the National Hurricane Center. It summarizes how the size of a storm has changed, and the areas potentially affected by sustained winds of tropical storm force (in orange) and hurricane force (in red) for tropical cyclones in the Atlantic and Eastern Pacific basins. This product is also issued for subtropical storms.
 
Tropical Cyclone Danger AreaThe Tropical Cyclone Danger Area is a graphical marine product depicting a tropical cyclone's track (out to 72 hours) and shades in a danger area determined by adding 100, 200, and 300 nautical miles plus the 34 knot wind radii to the 24-, 48-, and 72- hour forecast position respectively in the Atlantic and east Pacific. For the central Pacific the shaded danger area will varying in width dependent upon the hurricane specialists confidence in the track and the length of the 34 knot wind radii. In addition, areas of possible tropical cyclone genesis (out to 36 hours) are included and depicted as either a circular, rectangle, oval, or polygon shaped area. The product is prepared by the TPC and covers the entire Atlantic north of the equator and the Pacific north of the equator from the Mexican and Central America coast west to 140 west. CPHC prepares a separate chart for 140 west to the International Dateline north of the equator.
 
Tropical Cyclone Discussion (TCD)The TCD is a text product prepared by the National Hurricane Center (NHC) and Central Pacific Hurricane Center (CPHC) for tropical cyclones in their respective basin of responsibility. The TCD provides forecasters' reasoning behind the analysis and forecast of a tropical cyclone. Discussions include prognostic reasoning; objective techniques employed; NHC, CPHC, and Hydrometeorological Prediction Center guidance used; coordinated 12-, 24-, 36-, 48-, 72-, 96-, and 120-hour tropical cyclone forecast positions and maximum sustained wind speed forecasts; other meteorological decisions; and plans for watches and warnings. This product is also issued for subtropical storms.
 
Tropical Cyclone Forecast Advisories (TCM)The is a text product prepared by the National Hurricane Center (NHC) and the Central Pacific Hurricane Center (CPHC) for tropical cyclones in their respective basin of responsibility. TCMs are issued for the Atlantic and eastern Pacific basins by the NHC. TCMs are issued for the central Pacific by the CPHC. The product title depends on the intensity of the tropical cyclone, to include: Tropical Depression Advisory, Tropical Storm Advisory, Hurricane/Typhoon Advisory. This product is also issued for subtropical storms.
 
Tropical Cyclone Position Estimate (TCE)The Tropical Cyclone Position Estimate (TCE) is an event-driven (non-routinely issued) alphanumeric product comprised of information concerning the location of the center of a tropical cyclone as determined by land-based radar fixes. The National Hurricane Center (NHC), the Central Pacific Hurricane Center (CPHC), and the Weather Forecast Office (WFO) Guam prepare TCEs on an event-driven basis for tropical cyclone activity within the effective range of land base radars. NHC issues TCEs for tropical cyclone activity in the Atlantic and eastern north Pacific (north of the equator and east of 140 degrees west longitude) basins. CPHC issues TCEs for tropical cyclone activity in the central North Pacific (north of the equator between 140W and 180W longitude) basin and WFO Guam for the northwest Pacific (U.S. territories or the Republic of Palau, Federated States of Micronesia, and Republic of the Marshall Islands north of the equator and from 130W - 180W longitude).
 
Tropical Cyclone Public Advisories (TCP)This is a 2015 update to the existing to operational product. PPD updated to change issuance times.
 
Tropical Cyclone Report (TCR)The Tropical Cyclone Report (TCR) is a post-event overview of a tropical cyclone comprised of a narrative describing the overall storm and a detailed listing of 6-hourly location and intensity data in both text and graphic format. The National Hurricane Center (NHC) and the Central Pacific Hurricane Center (CPHC) prepare TCRs within 90 days of any tropical cyclone that occurs within their respective Area of Responsibility (AOR). NHC issues TCRs for tropical cyclone activity in the Atlantic and eastern north Pacific (north of the equator and east of 140 degrees west longitude) basins. CPHC issues TCRs for tropical cyclone activity in the central North Pacific (north of the equator between 140W and 180 degrees west longitude) basin.
 
Tropical Cyclone Storm Surge ProbabilitiesThe product consists of a graphic and GRIB2 data for creating the graphic for the Gulf of Mexico and Atlantic coastal areas of the continental United States. The graphic shows probabilities, in percent, of storm surge exceeding 2 feet through 25 feet, at 1 foot intervals (e.g., the probabilities in percent, of storm surge exceeding 2 feet, 3 feet, 4 feet, …, 25 feet). This storm surge graphic is based upon an ensemble of Sea, Lake, and Overland Surge from Hurricanes (SLOSH) model runs using the National Hurricane Center (NHC) official advisory and accounts for track, size, and intensity errors based on historical errors.
 
Tropical Cyclone Summary-Fixes (TCS)The TCS is an alphanumeric product which the Central Pacific Hurricane Center (CPHC) provides when there is a classifiable (using the Dvorak technique) tropical cyclone activity in the north central or south Pacific. The TCS is a satellite-based estimate of tropical cyclone location, movement, and intensity with a brief remarks section. Pacific Region's CPHC prepares TCS for a portion of their area of responsibility (AOR). The AORs for CPHC/Weather Forecast Office (WFO) Honolulu (CPHC is collocated with the Weather Forecast Office Honolulu) varies depending upon the program (tropical cyclone, aviation, marine, public, and satellite). For TCS program, CPHC's AOR is the area north of the equator between 140W - 180 longitude and from the equator to 25 S latitude between 120W to 160E.
 
Tropical Cyclone Surface Wind Speed Probabilities (TCSWSP) for the North Pacific Ocean in the NDFDThis update makes the TCSWSP in the NDFD for the North Pacific Ocean operational for the 2010 hurricane season. The TCSWSP elements depict probabilities, in percent, of sustained surface wind speeds. These probabilities are provided for wind speed thresholds equal to or exceeding 34-, 50-, and 64-knots. These wind speed probabilities are based on the track, intensity, and storm structure (size in terms of wind radii) uncertainties in the official tropical cyclone forecasts. TCSWSP elements covering the North Pacific Ocean are available in NDFD in experimental status. Similar elements for the continental U.S. are available in NDFD in operational status.
 
Tropical Cyclone Surface Wind Speed Probabilities - GraphicalThe Tropical Cyclone Surface Wind Speed Probabilities product displays probabilities in percent of sustained wind speeds equal to or exceeding 34-, 50-, and 64-knot wind speed thresholds. These wind speed probabilities are based on the track, intensity, and wind structure uncertainties in the official forecasts from the National Hurricane Center, Central Pacific Hurricane Center, and the Joint Typhoon Warning Center.
 
Tropical Cyclone Surface Wind Speed Probabilities - TextThe Tropical Cyclone Surface Wind Speed Probabilities text product contains two parts. The first part, called Maximum Wind Speed (Intensity) Probability Table, provides over a five day period what the probabilities are for the maximum sustained (1-minute average) wind speed of a tropical cyclone for various intensity categories. A second part, called Wind Speed Probability Table for Specific Locations, provides probabilities, in percent, of sustained wind speeds equal to or exceeding 34-, 50-, and 64-knot wind speed thresholds. These wind speed probabilities are based on the track, intensity, and wind structure uncertainties during recent years in the official forecasts from the National Hurricane Center and the Central Pacific Hurricane Center and are computed for coastal and inland cities as well as offshore locations (e.g., buoys).
 
Tropical Cyclone Surface Wind Speed Probabilities in NDFDThe NWS provides access to operational and experimental gridded forecasts of weather elements (e.g., maximum temperature, sky cover) through the National Digital Forecast Database (NDFD). The NDFD contains a seamless mosaic of digital forecasts from NWS field offices working in collaboration with the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP). The Tropical Cyclone Surface Wind Speed Probabilities (TCSWSP) is an NCEP, event-driven product. The TCSWSP is an experimental product which will be made available via the NDFD. This product depicts probabilities, in percent, of sustained surface wind speeds. These probabilities are expressed for wind speed thresholds equal to or exceeding 34-, 50-, and 64-knots. These wind speed probabilities are based on the track, intensity, and wind structure (size in terms of radii) uncertainties in the official forecasts from the National Hurricane Center (NHC). The product will cover the continental U.S. and adjacent waters.
 
Tropical Cyclone Threat Grids in the NDFDThe Tropical Cyclone (TC) Threat grids provide the worse-case plausible scenario or threat associated with the following hazards; wind, storm surge, flooding rain, and tornado. There are five levels to describe each TC Threat element; None, Low, Moderate, High, Extreme. The methodology for creating the grids takes in account the forecast magnitude and the associated forecast uncertainty for each of the hazards. The grids are produced only by coastal WFOs along the Atlantic and Gulf coasts as well as San Juan, PR whenever tropical cyclone watches and warnings are in effect for their area of responsibility
 
Tropical Cyclone Track and Watch/Warning GraphicUPDATES INCLUDE: Addition of CPHC as an issuing office Addition of Potential Tropical Cyclone and Post-Tropical Cyclone system types that necessitate issuance of the graphics This product is a graphical representation of text messages issued by NHC. It provides critical information on the forecast path of the tropical cyclone, forecast track uncertainty, and watches and warnings issued by NHC.The Tropical Cyclone Track and Watch/Warning Graphics are prepared by the National Weather Service (NWS) National Hurricane Center (NHC) and Central Pacific Hurricane Center (CPHC) for tropical cyclones in the Atlantic basin and eastern and central North Pacific basins. The graphics contain forecast track, an error cone along the track as well as coastal tropical storm and hurricane watches/warnings. To form the error cone, a set of imaginary circles are placed along the forecast track at the 12, 24, 36, 48, 72, 96, and 120 h positions, where the size of each circle is set so that it encloses 67% of the previous five years official forecast errors. The cone is then formed by smoothly connecting the area swept out by the set of circles. Both 3-day and 5-day versions of this product are created as well as that add the initial wind field to the other elements in the graphics. This product is also issued for all systems that NHC or CPHC are writing advisories, including subtropical storms, potential tropical cyclone, tropical cyclones, and post-tropical cyclones.
 
Tropical Cyclone Update (TCU)The TCU is a brief alphanumeric text product which the National Hurricane Center (NHC) and the Central Pacific Hurricane Center (CPHC) issue to inform customers of unexpected or sudden changes in a tropical cyclone or to post or cancel watches and warnings. NHC and CPHC issue TCUs on an event-driven basis in lieu of or preceding special advisories.
 
Tropical Cyclone Watch/Warning ProductThe Tropical Cyclone Watch/Warning product (TCV) is based upon the Valid Time Event Code (VTEC). It summarizes all new, continued, and cancelled tropical cyclone watches and warnings issued by: the National Hurricane Center (NHC) for the U.S. Atlantic and Gulf coasts, Puerto Rico and U.S. Virgin Islands; and the Central Pacific Hurricane Center (CPHC) for the main islands of Hawaii.
 
Tropical Cyclone Wind Field GraphicThis update makes the Tropical Cyclone Wind Field Graphic (TCWFG) issued by the Central Pacific Hurricane Center operational for the 2010 hurricane season. This graphic illustrates the areas potentially being affected by tropical cyclone sustained winds of varying force. The graphic also shows an approximate representation of coastal areas under a hurricane warning, hurricane watch, tropical storm warning and tropical storm watch. The white dot indicates the current position of the center of the tropical cyclone, and the dashed black line shows the history of the center of the tropical cyclone.
 
Tropical Pacific Mean Sea-Surface Temperature (SST) OutlookThe Climate Prediction Center's climate outlook techniques rely significantly upon the slowly varying global SST field and do not have usable accuracy at long lead times. These SST outlooks make tangible the results of research activities by scientists.
 
Tropical Streamline Surface AnalysisA graphic product issued from the WFO Honolulu, HI, that provides information on significant surface features over the Pacific Ocean Basin such as location of high and low pressure systems, areas of gale strength winds, and the Inter-tropical Convergence
 
Tropical Surface AnalysisA graphic product issued from the Tropical Prediction Center and the WFO Honolulu, HI, that provides a depiction of significant surface features over the Tropical Atlantic and Pacific Ocean Basins. Features such as the location of high and low pressure s
 
Tropical Weather Discussion (TWD)The TWD is an alphanumeric product providing information on current atmospheric conditions at the surface and aloft such as tropical cyclones, mesoscale and synoptic scale features, and areas of shallow and deep convection. This product is prepared over the tropical and subtropical Atlantic and Pacific ocean areas by the Tropical Prediction Center and the Honolulu Weather Forecast Office.
 
Tropical Weather Outlook (TWO)The Tropical Weather Outlook (TWO) provides probabilistic information, in 10-percent increments, about a system’s potential for developing into a tropical cyclone. The forecast and discussion is provided on a disturbance-by disturbance basis out to both 48 hours and 120 hours. The National Hurricane Center issues TWOs for the Atlantic and east Pacific basins while the Central Pacific Hurricane Center issues TWOs for the central Pacific basin.
 
Tropical Weather Summary (TWS)PDD updated for the following: Effective with the 2009 season, the product changes from a narrative to a mainly tabular format. The TWS is a monthly alphanumeric product issued by the National Hurricane Center (NHC) and the Central Pacific Hurricane Center (CPHC) to summarize tropical cyclone activity for the previous month. NHC issues summaries for tropical cyclone activity over the Atlantic and eastern north Pacific (north of the equator and east of 140W longitude) basins. CPHC issues summaries for tropical cyclone activity over the central North Pacific (north of the equator between 140W and 180W longitude) basin. The centers issue new summaries the first day of each month from June through December. The last TWS of the tropical cyclone season (December issuance) covers activity for the entire season from June through the end of November. Effective with the 2009 season, the product changes from a narrative to a mainly tabular format.
 
Tucson, AZ WFO Precipitation Monitoring Page The Tucson climate web page displays precipitation analyses for National Weather Service observation sites in southeast Arizona. This web page allows a person to select various methods for precipitation analysis with an emphasis on drought monitoring. Analyses can vary by length of time and geographic area of interest. Data is presented in a graphical form of time versus amount.
 
U. S. Drought MonitorNOAA's Climate Prediction Center (CPC) and National Climatic Data Center (NCDC), the U.S. Department of Agriculture, and the National Drought Mitigation Center (NDMC) jointly issues this graphic summarizing the extent and intensity of drought conditions
 
U.S. Drought OutlookCPC issues a national Drought Outlook for the remaining part of the month of issue plus the next three months
 
U.S. Drought Outlook DiscussionThe Climate Prediction Center (CPC) issues a Drought Outlook discussion for the remaining part of the month of issuance plus the next three months.
 
UltraViolet Radiation Grids in the NDGDThe following gridded data is now available in the National Digital Guidance Database (NDGD): Ultraviolet Index, Daily Maximum Ultraviolet Index and Downward Short Wave Radiation Flux. These grids will be derived automatically from the 1200 UTC model run of the Global Forecast System (GFS) for the Conterminous United States (CONUS). The Ultraviolet Index grids will be available for each daylight hour out to 48 hours, while the Daily Maximum Ultraviolet Index grids will be available once per day out to 120 hours and the Downward Short Wave Radiation Flux grids will be available for every third daylight hour out to 120 hours
 
Volcanic Ash AdvisoryThe Volcanic Ash Advisory (VAA) is an alphanumeric product providing observational information on volcanic eruptions, and observational and forecast information on the vertical and horizontal extent of airborne volcanic ash.
 
Water Resource Outlook Multi-Media BriefingThis Internet-based multi-media recorded briefing provides water managers in the Southeast U.S. with a one to three month water resource outlook based on current surface water/groundwater/soil conditions, reservoir conditions, input from state and federal water resource partners on supply and water use, Climate Prediction Center weekly/monthly temperature and precipitation forecasts, and SERFC ensemble streamflow predictions.
 
Water Resources Streamflow OutlookThe National Weather Services (NWS) Water Resources Streamflow Outlook webpage and text product provides expected streamflow conditions for basins across the Ohio Valley for 30-days, 30- to 60days and 60- to 90-days. In the last few years, the NWS has added the Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service (AHPS) to it suite of hydrologic services. As part of it, the River Forecast Centers (RFC?s), began issuing 90-day probabilistic forecasts for river forecast points using the National Weather Service River Forecast Systems (NWSRFS) Ensemble Streamflow Prediction (ESP) service. With the technology of ESP many opportunities are available for the advancement of the hydrologic sciences. At the same time, there are gaps within the current AHPS program that need to be filled. They include short term probabilistic forecasts and 30, 60 and 90 day streamflow forecasts for our customers and partners.
 
Weather Activity PlannerThe Weather Activity Planner (WAP) is an easy to use interface that permits public access to NOAAs National Weather Service (NWS) Weather Forecast Offices (WFOs) local digital forecast data base. The web page interface allows an individual to enter a range of values for specific weather parameters and obtain a forecast for the defined area of interest. The output is forecast data pulled directly from the local WFOs digital forecast data base, and represents average conditions for the next 7 days across a 5 km grid nearest the user-selected point. The resulting data is presented graphically, highlighting periods when the selected range of values applies. The tool helps satisfy e-gov initiatives by offering an avenue to obtain government-provided data.
 
Web-Enabled International Flight Folder Documentation Program (WebIFFDP)Website distribution/access to International Flight Folders currently available through facsimile-based system. This is a website maintained by AWC with global aviation weather information. It is intended for use by airline operators for international flights originating or ending in the United States. As a contracting state of the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO), the United States is obligated to provide flight documentation services to the international aviation community. On October 1, 1998, in accordance with Chapter nine of Annex 3 to the Convention on Civil Aviation, the Aviation Weather Center (AWC) began providing the required meteorological information to Airline operators and flight crew members for the purposes of dispatch planning, pre-flight briefing, and en-route guidance. The information for the International Flight Folder Documentation Program (IFFDP) is currently transferred via a facsimile service. Web-enabled International Flight Folder Documentation Program (WebIFFDP), is a replacement of the current facsimile-based International Flight Folder Documentation Program (IFFDP). WebIFFDP is available for use 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.
 
Weekend Weather GraphicWeb site statistics have shown that traffic on WFO websites increases as the weekend approaches. Customers are looking for the forecast for the upcoming weekend so that they can plan their activities. The Weekend Weather Graphic provides a quick and easily accessible view of the forecast for the weekend. The Weekend Weather Graphic is comprised of maximum temperature (MaxT),minimum temperature(MinT), and probability of precipitation (PoP) derived from the NDFD grids for the WFO forecast area.
 
Weekly Weather and Crop BulletinThe Climate Prediction Center's (CPC) and U.S. Department of Agriculture's Joint Agricultural Weather Facility (JAWF) issue this weekly report containing written summaries of domestic and international agricultural weather conditions.
 
Western Region Fire Weather/Marine Point Forecast Matrix (PFM)Land management agencies have expressed a need for easily accessible tabular forecast data that is tailored toward fire behavior applications. A fire weather version of the Point Forecast Matrix (PFM) table fits this need well because it allows agency specialists to quickly run simple fire behavior models for planning purposes. This is turn allows land management agencies to ensure the safety of fire crews as well as better plan prescribed burns and other projects in a cost and resource effective manner.
 
Western Region Graphical Weather Story of the DayThe Graphical “Weather Story of the Day” is a graphical representation (product) which depicts the most important weather feature in the forecast area of responsibility of individual NWS Weather Forecast Offices (WFO) in Western Region. The “Weather Story of the Day” is not time dependent. That is, the product depicts the most significant weather feature through the 7-day forecast period. A graphical user interface allows the forecaster to include a brief text, a few sentences in length, describing the “Weather Story of the Day” graphical product. If necessary the product may include a series of images to more clearly communicate complex weather situations.
 
Western Region Headquarter Web Site/PageThe Western Region (WR) Headquarter Web Site/Page provides access to a description of Western Region Headquarters (WRHQ) and resources, a summary of current watch/warnings in effect, and some visual pages that provide links to WR offices and other National Weather Service (NWS) sites.
 
Western Region Standardized Fire Weather Web Pages The need for improved fire weather information via the internet by land management and fire suppression agencies in Western Region (WR) is continually increasing. Multiple fire weather user agencies have requested a consistent WFO fire weather web page layout and more interactive graphical web pages to provide critical fire weather information. To account for these requests, WR tested consistent, interactive, fire weather web pages at every WR WFO from August 1, 2008 to June 1, 2009. Customer comment via a standard web survey,e-mail and face-to-face fire weather meetings was overwhelmingly positive. The pages became operational on November 2, 2009.
 
WFO Display of Ceiling Forecast GraphicThe Ceiling Forecast Graphic is a web-based presentation of digital ceiling forecast data originating from local Weather Forecast Office (WFO) digital databases. The WFO digital forecast data are uploaded to a regional web server. These graphic images display ceilings from the time of issuance out to 24 hours.
 
WFO Eureka Humboldt Bay Bar Graphical ForecastA graphical display of wave height, period, direction and areas of extreme wave steepness or breaking potential in and near the entrance to Humboldt Bay, CA
 
WFO WRF_NMM The WRF NMM is run locally at the WFO. It generates hourly output data out to 48 hours. The high resolution model is used for operational forecasting and research. Model Output graphics, generated by GEMPAK software, are posted for 3 hourly forecast time steps to a local WFO web page. The fields include geopotential heights, vorticity, temperatures, dew point, relative humidity, wind, vertical velocity, freezing level, precipitation amount and type, seal level pressure, thickness, clouds, precipitable water, convective available potential energy (CAPE), and convective inhibition (CIN). The web page is a convenient way for the local customers to view the same meteorological forecast data as the local WFO forecaster. This model has been run operationally at WFO Sacramento since May 2009 and the PDD is being expanded to provide this capability to other WFOs in the WR.
 
Wind Speed Probabilities-based Tropical Cyclone Danger GraphicThe Tropical Analysis and Forecast Branch (TAFB) is providing a Tropical Cyclone Danger Area graphic based on the 34-kt wind speed probabilities through 72-hours from the latest tropical cyclone advisory for an active tropical cyclone. The graphic outlines avoidance areas using the 10% and 50% 34-kt wind speed probability contours from the latest tropical cyclone advisory issuances for both the Atlantic and East Pacific basins (Figures 1 and 2). The current Tropical Cyclone Danger Area graphic utilizes the mariners 1-2-3 rule to outline avoidance areas through 72 hours for active tropical cyclones. Feedback from users indicated that the use of the 1-2-3 methodology has led to “over-warned” large avoidance areas. The 1-2-3 methodology assumes an average forecast track error of 100 nmi at Day 1, 200 nmi at Day 2 and 300 nmi at Day 3 rule (Figure 3). These values are well above the most recent 10-year averaged forecast track errors of 50 nmi at Day 1, 85 nmi at Day 2 and 120 nmi at Day 3.
 
Winds and Temperatures Aloft ForecastThe Winds and Temperatures Aloft Forecast (FDHW) is an alphanumeric product providing a coded forecast for winds and temperatures aloft for Lihue, Honolulu, Kahului and Hilo within the National Weather Service's Pacific Region's Weather Forecast Office (
 
World Area Forecast System (WAFS) Global Grids Visualization The NWS Display of WAFS Grids for Turbulence, Icing, Cb Cloud and Wind is a graphical representation of the grids issued jointly by the World Area Forecast Centers (WAFCs) in the US and the UK. These grids are sanctioned by the ICAO and the FAA for use in flight planning. They are available for various levels from forecast hours 6 to 36, in three hourly time steps, in GRIB2 format. This product will provide users a way to display the grids at all levels and time steps via a web page with a GIS display. Users will be able to overlay multiple levels and forecast parameters and loop through the time range, as well as pan and zoom on the map
 
World Area Forecast System (WAFS) Significant Weather High Level ChartsThe WAFS Significant Weather (SIGWX) High Level Charts are graphic representations of forecasted significant weather on a global scale. The SIGWX High Level Charts indicate the 24-hour future position of jet streams, tropopause heights, convection, turb
 
WPC Days 6-7 QPFThis product provides Quantitative Precipitation Forecasts (QPFs) for days 6 and 7 in six hour increments as well as an aggregated day 6 and 7 total, and a complete 7-day total.
 
WR Climate Web PageThe WR Climate Web Page provides a single web based interface for the public to more easily access official climate forecasts, climate products and daily weather summaries currently issued as part of the routine suite of NWS services.
 
WR Water Supply PageThe WR Water Supply Page provides a single web page for displaying water supply forecasts from all WR RFCs. Forecasts are color coded according to percentage of normal runoff volume. More specific information for individual forecast points is available by drilling down to points.

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