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Report - listing of Operational Products in database, sorted by Newest First.
 
Product Name Brief Description Operational Date
Changes to the criteria for issuing tropical cyclone watches and warnings to include certain land-threatening disturbances that are not yet tropical cyclones The National Weather Service (NWS) can now issue watches, warnings, and graphical and textual advisory products for disturbances that are not yet a tropical cyclone, but which pose the threat of bringing tropical storm or hurricane conditions to land areas within 48 hours. Under previous long standing NWS policy, the NWS has not been permitted to issue a hurricane or tropical storm watch or warning until after a tropical cyclone had formed. 2017-05-15 
Changes to Tropical Cyclone Forecast Graphics and GIS Files Effective on or about May 15, 2017, the appearance of the graphics accompanying tropical cyclone advisory packages issued by the National Hurricane Center (NHC) and Central Pacific Hurricane Center (CPHC) changeD. These changes are required for the NHC and CPHC to begin issuing forecasts and watches/warnings for potential tropical cyclones.three new Keyhole Markup Language (KML) files will be available and the wind speed probability Geographic Information System (GIS) files will be available at higher resolution. 2017-05-15 
Experimental Impact Based Warnings This is an expansion of the NWS Experimental Central Region Impact Based Warning demonstration in 2012 and 2013.Severe Thunderstorm Warning (SVR), Tornado Warning (TOR) and Severe Weather Statement (SVS) products will be stratified into categories distinguishing extreme cases from base convective warnings. Additional enhanced wording will be included to convey information about associated impacts, specific hazards expected, and recommended actions, both within the bullet statements and as part of the tag line codes.Based on feedback from the Central Region 2013 Experimental Impact Based Warnings, the 2014 demonstration will include some changes. The most significant change for the 2014 national experiment is that the impact statements for “CONSIDERABLE” and “CATASTROPHIC” serve as markers of confidence of tornado occurrence, with both reflecting an “elevated tier” of tornado damage and risk. The term CATASTROPHIC will only be used when a tornado is striking an actual community. Issuing enhanced convective warnings in 2014 will be the 38 Central Region Weather Forecast Offices (WFOs), 5 WFOs within NWS Southern Region (Norman, OK; Tulsa, OK; Jackson, MS; Lubbock, TX and San Angelo, TX); 1 WFO within NWS Eastern Region (Blacksburg, VA); and 2 WFOs within NWS Western Region (Great Falls, MT and Glasgow, MT). 2017-05-10 
Experimental Graphical Forecasts for Aviation In May 2015 the National Weather Service received a formal request from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) for the NWS to cease production of textual Area Forecasts (FAs), contingent upon the provision of equivalent meteorological information in support of aviation.The Graphical Forecasts for Aviation include observations and forecasts valid for the continental United States. Observational data and warnings are time synchronized and available by the hour for the current time and the prior six hours. Hourly model data and forecasts, including National Digital Forecast Data (NDFD), are available to 15 hours in the future. Wind, icing and turbulence forecasts are available in 3000 ft. increments from the surface up to 18000 ft. MSL, and in 6000 ft. increments from 18,000 MSL to FL420 (42,000 ft. MSL). Turbulence forecasts are also broken into LO (below 18,000 MSL) and HI (at or above 18,000 MSL) graphics. A maximum icing graphic and maximum wind velocity graphic (regardless of altitude) are also available.Multiple fields of interest are combined in categories that the user is able to select from the top level Weather menu. The data for each category is determined by the time period, observations (current time and the prior six hours) and forecasts (valid up to 15 hours in the future). Additional information is available in text format when mouse-clicking on the map or using the hover function. The “Configure” menu enables the user to customize the satellite and radar displays in addition to choosing parameters for the observations and aviation advisories displayed. Imagery, observations, and forecast graphics are overlaid on high-resolution basemaps from ESRI, including colored relief, satellite and street views. Overlays include navigational aids, airports, and heliports for the entire United States. More detail is revealed as you zoom in and individual layers can be turned on or off independently. 2017-04-13 
Aviation Weather Center Impacts Terminal Aerodrome Forecast (TAF) Board The AWC Impacts TAF board is a time series display of weather conditions at select airports across the United States. Each box (hourly forecasts from TAF) is color-coded based on the level of the hazard. White represents no impact, yellow slight impact, orange medium impact, and red high impact. The letters in the box represent the cause of the hazard. They are as follows: -CIG – Ceiling (hundreds of feet, Above Ground Level [AGL]) -VIS – Visibility (statute miles) -WX – Weather (see legend) -WSpd – Wind speed (knots) -WGust – Wind gusts (knots) 2016-11-28 
National Spot Forecast Webpage NWS Spot is a website where NWS customers can request a spot forecast. The customer answers form questions on the website and then the website will compose an STQ text product that is sent to the AWIPS of the Forecast Office that is required to write the forecast. The forecast is generally composed on AWIPS as an FWS text product and transmitted like any other text product that is issued by the forecast office. The NWS Spot website databases these FWS products. Each FWS product includes a “.TAG” line, which helps the NWS Spot website associate each forecast request with a completed forecast. Spot forecasts are a critical mission of the National Weather Service. These forecasts are needed (for example) for those fighting wildfires, conducting prescribed burns, cleaning up HAZMAT incidents (like deepwater horizon), for search and rescue operations, and other critical operations, as needed. 2016-11-01 
AWC PIREP Online Submission Form Pilot Reports (PIREPs) are reports of meteorological phenomena encountered in flight. These reports assist other pilots, dispatchers, and flight planners with flight plan preparation, situational awareness, and operational decision making. The PIREPs are integrated into the NWS forecast production process to help improve the accuracy of the forecasts, which include human generated products such as AIRMETs and SIGMETs as well as automated products such as the Graphical Turbulence Guidance (GTG), the Current Icing Product (CIP) and the Forecast Icing Product (FIP). PIREPs are particularly valuable in areas where surface-based observations are unavailable. The Aviation Weather Center PIREP online submission form enables registered users to enter PIREPs electronically, which will be distributed and displayed graphically on the Aviation Weather Center’s website www.aviationweather.gov. Users will be able to register at www.aviationweather.gov/user and submit their PIREPS at www.aviationweather.gov/airep/submit. All users will be subject to validation on the basis of having (1) an active pilot’s license (2) a .gov or .mil email address or (3) a group ID number for airlines. All other account requests will be evaluated on a case by case basis. 2016-09-29 
Alaska Region NDFD Grids 6km PDD updated in 2014 to extend comment period. PDD updated in 2013 to extend comment period. PDD updated in 2012 to extend comment period. PDD updated in 2011 to extend comment period. PDD updated in 2010 to extend comment period and to update links. PDD updated in 2009 to include new elements: Hazards, Weather, Temperature, Dew Point, Wind Gust, Sky Cover, Apparent Temperature, Relative Humidity, Quantitative Precipitation Forecast (QPF) and Snow Amount. Under statute, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) National Weather Service (NWS) is charged to collect data on climate, water, and weather, provide forecasts and warnings of severe weather in order to protect life and property, and create and disseminate forecasts and other weather information for the benefit of a wide range of weather sensitive businesses and activities. By capitalizing on rapid advances in science and technology and infusing these advances into its operations, the NWS has taken steps to proactively respond to ever changing and growing demands of its users. The most recent experimental digital datasets (and associated graphic forecast displays) integrated into NDFD are the following elements for Alaska: Maximum Temperature, Minimum Temperature, 12-hour Probability of Precipitation, Wind Speed, Wind Direction, and Significant Wave Height. 2016-08-24 
Wind Speed Probabilities-based Tropical Cyclone Danger Graphic The Tropical Analysis and Forecast Branch (TAFB) is providing a Tropical Cyclone Danger Area graphic based on the 34-kt wind speed probabilities through 72-hours from the latest tropical cyclone advisory for an active tropical cyclone. The graphic outlines avoidance areas using the 10% and 50% 34-kt wind speed probability contours from the latest tropical cyclone advisory issuances for both the Atlantic and East Pacific basins (Figures 1 and 2). The current Tropical Cyclone Danger Area graphic utilizes the mariners 1-2-3 rule to outline avoidance areas through 72 hours for active tropical cyclones. Feedback from users indicated that the use of the 1-2-3 methodology has led to “over-warned” large avoidance areas. The 1-2-3 methodology assumes an average forecast track error of 100 nmi at Day 1, 200 nmi at Day 2 and 300 nmi at Day 3 rule (Figure 3). These values are well above the most recent 10-year averaged forecast track errors of 50 nmi at Day 1, 85 nmi at Day 2 and 120 nmi at Day 3. 2016-08-01 
Potential Storm Surge Flooding Map The Potential Storm Surge Flooding Map is a product that provides valuable information on potential storm surge flooding for areas along the U.S. Gulf and East Coast at risk from storm surge during a tropical cyclone event 2016-06-01 
Mixed Case Letters in WFO Text Products Many NWS partners and users have identified the need for NWS text products to be provided in mixed case letters and to include an expanded punctuation and character set. Previously, national Public Information Statements (PNSs), including national Service Change Notices (SCNs) and national Technical Implementation Notices (TINs), were provided in mixed case letters with an expanded punctuation/character set for a risk reduction effort using non-operational products: (http://www.weather.gov/os/notification/scn10-28mixed_case.txt). 2016-05-11 
Forecast of Reference Crop Evapotranspiration (FRET) for Short Canopy Vegetation FRET is the expected depth of water (in hundredths of inches) that would evaporate and transpire from a reference crop under the forecast weather conditions on a daily and weekly basis over the next 7 days. The FRET is for short crops with an approximate height of 12 cm similar to full cover grasses. Daily FRET grids for the next 7 days, total FRET grids for the 7-day period, FRET departure from normal grids, and climatology grids for reference evapotranspiration are available via a web page interface for the nation via the NDFD.An ETT text product composed of a supplemental table generated from the gridded data is available at: http://www.nws.noaa.gov/view/validProds.php?prod=ETT 2016-04-13 

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