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Listing of DELETED Experimental Products
 
DELETED Product Name Brief Description Submitter Status
Experimental Alaska Region NDFD Grids PDD updated in 2014 to extend comment period. PDD updated in 2013 to extend comment period. PDD updated in 2012 to extend comment period. PDD updated in 2011 to extend comment period. PDD updated in 2010 to extend comment period and to update links. PDD updated in 2009 to include new elements: Hazards, Weather, Temperature, Dew Point, Wind Gust, Sky Cover, Apparent Temperature, Relative Humidity, Quantitative Precipitation Forecast (QPF) and Snow Amount. Under statute, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) National Weather Service (NWS) is charged to collect data on climate, water, and weather, provide forecasts and warnings of severe weather in order to protect life and property, and create and disseminate forecasts and other weather information for the benefit of a wide range of weather sensitive businesses and activities. By capitalizing on rapid advances in science and technology and infusing these advances into its operations, the NWS has taken steps to proactively respond to ever changing and growing demands of its users. The most recent experimental digital datasets (and associated graphic forecast displays) integrated into NDFD are the following elements for Alaska: Maximum Temperature, Minimum Temperature, 12-hour Probability of Precipitation, Wind Speed, Wind Direction, and Significant Wave Height. Carven Scott Approved for Operational
Experimental Aviation Weather Center Impacts Terminal Aerodrome Forecast (TAF) Board The experimental AWC Impacts TAF board is a time series display of weather conditions at select airports across the United States. Each box (hourly forecasts from TAF) is color-coded based on the level of the hazard. White represents no impact, yellow slight impact, orange medium impact, and red high impact. The letters in the box represent the cause of the hazard. They are as follows: -CIG – Ceiling (hundreds of feet, Above Ground Level [AGL]) -VIS – Visibility (statute miles) -WX – Weather (see legend) -WSpd – Wind speed (knots) -WGust – Wind gusts (knots) Mike Bettwy Approved for Operational
Experimental AWC PIREP Online Submission Form Pilot Reports (PIREPs) are reports of meteorological phenomena encountered in flight. These reports assist other pilots, dispatchers, and flight planners with flight plan preparation, situational awareness, and operational decision making. The PIREPs are integrated into the NWS forecast production process to help improve the accuracy of the forecasts, which include human generated products such as AIRMETs and SIGMETs as well as automated products such as the Graphical Turbulence Guidance (GTG), the Current Icing Product (CIP) and the Forecast Icing Product (FIP). PIREPs are particularly valuable in areas where surface-based observations are unavailable. The Aviation Weather Center PIREP online submission form enables registered users to enter PIREPs electronically, which will be distributed and displayed graphically on the Aviation Weather Center’s website www.aviationweather.gov. Users will be able to register at www.aviationweather.gov/user and submit their PIREPS at www.aviationweather.gov/airep/submit. All users will be subject to validation on the basis of having (1) an active pilot’s license (2) a .gov or .mil email address or (3) a group ID number for airlines. All other account requests will be evaluated on a case by case basis. Mike Bettwy Approved for Operational
Experimental Forecast of Reference Evapotranspiration for Short Canopy Vegetation (CR) The experimental reference evapotranspiration forecast will be displayed as a graphic of gridded data within the WFOs county warning area. The forecast is the expected amount of daily reference evapotranspiration in hundredths of an inch for the next 7 days and a total reference of evapotranspiration for the 7 day period. The forecast is calculated by standardizing on the tall canopy vegetation (50 cm full cover alfalfa) algorithm. This product will be issued three times a day around 5 am, 12 pm, and 4 pm local time. John S. Eise Approved to Discontinue
Experimental Forecast of Reference Evapotranspiration for Short Canopy Vegetation (WR) The experimental reference evapotranspiration forecast will be displayed as a graphic of gridded data and a supplemental tabular display of selected sites within the WFOs county warning area. The forecast is the expected amount of daily reference evapotranspiration in hundredths of an inch for the next 7 days and a total reference of evapotranspiration for the 7 day period. The forecast is calculated by standardizing on the short canopy vegetation (12 cm or 4.72 in grasses or alfalfa) algorithm. This product will be issued twice a day around 5 am and pm local time. Claudia Bell Approved to Discontinue
Experimental Impacts Terminal Aerodrome Forecast (TAF) Board The Aviation Weather Center (AWC) experimental Impacts Terminal Aerodrome Forecast (TAF) board is a time series display of weather conditions at airports with significant impact on the National Airspace System (NAS) across the United States. Each box (hourly forecasts from TAF) is color-coded based on the level of the impact, defined by thresholds unique to each individual airport. White represents no impact, yellow slight impact, orange moderate impact, and red high impact. The letters in the box represent the cause of the hazard (including CIG, VIS, WX, WSpd, WGst).The AWC experimental Impacts TAF Board allows the aviation community to quickly ascertain the specific weather hazards at key airports across the United States, based on the TAFs. Information on the timing and level of impact are also included. This data is displayed graphically on the AWC’s testbed website at: http://testbed.aviationweather.gov/taf/board. The display assists dispatchers and flight planners with flight plan preparation, while also raising situational awareness and improving operational decision making. The AWC experimental Impacts TAF Board is also meant to consolidate pre-existing situational displays into a single, authoritative source. Mike Bettwy Approved for Experimental Implementation
Experimental Impacts Terminal Aerodrome Forecast (TAF) Board The Aviation Weather Center (AWC) experimental Impacts Terminal Aerodrome Forecast (TAF) board is a time series display of weather conditions at airports with significant impact on the National Airspace System (NAS) across the United States. Each box (hourly forecasts from TAF) is color-coded based on the level of the impact, defined by thresholds unique to each individual airport. White represents no impact, yellow slight impact, orange moderate impact, and red high impact. The letters in the box represent the cause of the hazard (including CIG, VIS, WX, WSpd, WGst).The AWC experimental Impacts TAF Board allows the aviation community to quickly ascertain the specific weather hazards at key airports across the United States, based on the TAFs. Information on the timing and level of impact are also included. This data is displayed graphically on the AWC’s testbed website at: http://testbed.aviationweather.gov/taf/board. The display assists dispatchers and flight planners with flight plan preparation, while also raising situational awareness and improving operational decision making. The AWC experimental Impacts TAF Board is also meant to consolidate pre-existing situational displays into a single, authoritative source. Mike Bettwy Approved for Experimental Implementation
Experimental Mixed Case Letters in WFO Text Products Many NWS partners and users have identified the need for NWS text products to be provided in mixed case letters and to include an expanded punctuation and character set. Previously, national Public Information Statements (PNSs), including national Service Change Notices (SCNs) and national Technical Implementation Notices (TINs), were provided in mixed case letters with an expanded punctuation/character set for a risk reduction effort using non-operational products: (http://www.weather.gov/os/notification/scn10-28mixed_case.txt). This experimental PDD expands the risk reduction effort to a few operational, but non-critical, Weather Forecast Office (WFO) text products: the Area Forecast Discussion (AFD), the Regional Weather Summary (RWS) and local PNS’s (including local SCN’s and TIN’s) for four WFOs: Kansas City/Pleasant Hill, MO - EAX Louisville, KY -LMK Spokane, WA - OTX Tallahassee, FL - TAE Art Thomas Approved for Operational
Experimental National Spot Forecast Webpage NWS Spot is a website where NWS customers can request a spot forecast. The customer answers form questions on the website and then the website will compose an STQ text product that is sent to the AWIPS of the Forecast Office that is required to write the forecast. The forecast is generally composed on AWIPS as an FWS text product and transmitted like any other text product that is issued by the forecast office. The NWS Spot website databases these FWS products. Each FWS product includes a “.TAG” line, which helps the NWS Spot website associate each forecast request with a completed forecast. Spot forecasts are a critical mission of the National Weather Service. These forecasts are needed (for example) for those fighting wildfires, conducting prescribed burns, cleaning up HAZMAT incidents (like deepwater horizon), for search and rescue operations, and other critical operations, as needed. Robyn Heffeman Awaiting Approval for Operational
Experimental NHC/TAFB Satellite Rainfall QPE and QPF WebPage (graphical portion) Experimental Comment period for the graphical portion of this webpage has been extended through November 2014. This experimental webpage provides event-driven satellite-based quantitative precipitation estimates (QPE) and model-derived quantitative precipitation forecasts (QPF) for tropical cyclones and tropical disturbances affecting areas within the National Hurricane Center and Central Pacific Hurricane Center areas of responsibility (AOR). The experimental product represents an improvement over the existing text-only satellite precipitation estimate product which is based on the Griffith-Woodley technique developed in the 1970s. The experimental product provides more robust satellite-based precipitation estimates from the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) Blended and the Climate Prediction Center (CPC) QMORPH techniques and a time-matched forecast from the Global Forecast System (GFS) in tabular text and storm centered graphical formats. A graphical version of these precipitation estimates is also provided. In addition, the experimental product provides a graphical 24 hour QPF from the Princeton Geophysical Fluid Dynamics (GFDL), the NOAA Hurricane Weather Research and Forecast (HWRF), and the GFS models. The target audience for this product primarily includes the forecast centers in the Caribbean, Mexico, Central America, and the Eastern and Central North Pacific. . In addition, decision support service (DSS) entities would have access to targeted QPF guidance that may be of assistance for distributing and directing resources to areas impacted by heavy rainfall Hugh D. Cobb Approved to Discontinue
Experimental Potential Storm Surge Flooding Map The Potential Storm Surge Flooding Map is an experimental product that provides valuable information on potential storm surge flooding for areas along the U.S. Gulf and East Coast at risk from storm surge during a tropical cyclone event John F. Kuhn Evaluation Period Ended
Experimental RFC Decision Support Interface A Google Earth based mapping service in which a variety of existing RFC products would be available for display and overlay.The NWS West Gulf RFC and Arkansas Rred Basin RGC are testing a new Hydrologic Decision Support Map Service that melds a variety of spatial data products on the same background map to aid analysis and decision making. The interface provides stakeholders and the flexibility to create customized maps and the ability to scale maps beyond a single RFC boundary. Tracy Clark Approved to Discontinue
Experimental Southern Region Mapping API Widget/Smartphone Web Page A standardized way in which any office could easily embed a highly-customizable Google Maps interface and menu system into any web page. Melinda Bailey Approved to Discontinue
Experimental Wind Speed Probabilities-based Tropical Cyclone Danger Graphic The Tropical Analysis and Forecast Branch (TAFB) is providing on an experimental basis a Tropical Cyclone Danger Area graphic based on the 34-kt wind speed probabilities through 72-hours from the latest tropical cyclone advisory for an active tropical cyclone. The graphic outlines avoidance areas using the 10% and 50% 34-kt wind speed probability contours from the latest tropical cyclone advisory issuances for both the Atlantic and East Pacific basins (Figures 1 and 2). The current Tropical Cyclone Danger Area graphic utilizes the mariners 1-2-3 rule to outline avoidance areas through 72 hours for active tropical cyclones. Feedback from users indicated that the use of the 1-2-3 methodology has led to “over-warned” large avoidance areas. The 1-2-3 methodology assumes an average forecast track error of 100 nmi at Day 1, 200 nmi at Day 2 and 300 nmi at Day 3 rule (Figure 3). These values are well above the most recent 10-year averaged forecast track errors of 50 nmi at Day 1, 85 nmi at Day 2 and 120 nmi at Day 3. Hugh Cobb Approved for Operational

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